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Full text of "Explorer"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/explorer1972lasa 



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Explorer '72 
La Salle College 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19141 






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Security costs in 1970-71 increased 42% over 
1969-70, from $117,225.66 in 1969-70 to 
$166,256.93 in 1970-71. The principal cause of this 
increase was the introduction of co-education and 
the need for establishing three additional 24 hour 
posts in the areas of the residence halls. 







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CLASS OF 1974 STEERING COMMITTEE 

Many eons ago, sundry Earth Mothers gathered in the land of Gilgamesh, 
and they were smitten with many vile and sordid offspring. And the name of 
this pack of wild and reckless family was Governmenti. 

As the millenia passed, the deeds of this family of bastard offspring be- 
came infamous among the population of the earth. Again and again, the 
population rose up against this dynasty, but were frustrated each time, as 
the people could not escape the encompassing influence of Governmenti. 

Until one century, not too long ago, the situation looked bleak and hope- 
less. A new and different strain in the family had developed, and culminated 
in the person of Governmentus Committeeus. 

He immediately set about the task of righting the many injustices that 
were inherent in his brothers. 

Reaction was swift, and underhanded. Many were the weapons employed 
by his older and more corrupt brothers to block out this ray of sunlight. No 
method was ruled out to annihilate the younger, more innocent sibling. 

However, in its innocence, it prospered and grew strong. Allies were made 
with the general population, strengthening Committeeus so that his message 
of power coming from below could spread throughout the entire community. 

In the end, Committeeus was all there was, and flowers bloomed once 
again in the land, for his deeds were wonderous. 



Kevin J. Flynn 
Ex-Treasurer 
Class of 1974 



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The castle walls against the 
back of the stage, together with 
the staggered series of platforms 
that run the width of the stage, 
form the uncluttered framework 
which gives the necessary room 
for the complexities of the play to 
blossom. Ralph Batman, the 
student designer (not only of the 
sets but of the costumes as well), 
hopes to get further work in set 
design through his exposure here 
an ambition complicated at the 





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James Boerckel 



John Bogansky 



Alan Bond William Bondiskey 




Paul Boyle 



Robert Boyle Bro. Thomas Breighner 



Joseph Breitner 



John Brennan 




Joseph Briggman 



Edmond Brodbine 



Joseph Brogan 



Craig Brooks 



Donald Browne 



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Hubert Brucker 



James Bruno 



Joseph Bucci 




Michael Burke 



Joseph Cacchio 



Joseph Calabrese 



Richard Caldarola 



Michael Canavan 




Francis Capista 



Joseph Capista 



Thomas Capizzi 



Richard Capper 



George Carbone 




Francis Carry 



Lawrence Carugno Joseph Caruso 




John Casey 



Joseph Casey 



John Cassidy 



Manus Cassidy 



Michael Cassidy 




John Chang Robert Chesterton 



Charles Chew 



Robert Christian 



Harry Chugani 




Starlene Ciaverelli Br. Michael Cimerola 



Stanley Cios 



William Clark 



Jonathan Cofer 




Robert Cohen 




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James Colella 



Bernard Coley 



William Collier 



Richard Colom 




Theodore Crawford Gregory Crosby 



Aloysius Cummings 



William Daly 



Gregory Davis 




David Dawson 



Roger Dellamotta 



Lawrence De Marie 



Sam De Martino 




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John De Virgiliis 




Adrian Donaghue 



Francis Donahue 



Vincent Donnelly 



William Donohue 



James Donovan 




Thomas Dooley 



William Dorsey 



Dennis Dougherty 



Bernard Dowling 



William Doyle 




William Duffy 



Joseph Dunn 



Paul Duvoisin 




Daniel Ellis George Endrigan 





Joseph Everly 




Edward Farell 



George Fedorijczuk Richard Feeney 



James Fenerty 



John Fenningham 




Frank Ferraro 



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Harvey Giberson, Jr. 




Anthony Gillespie 



James Giordano 



Thomas Giordano 



Thomas Gluth 



Shawn Glynn 




Edith Goldberg 



Gilbert Golding Lawrence Goldner James Goodbody 



William Gordon 




James Greaves 



Robert Greco 



Thomas Greig John Griesemer, Jr. 




Joseph Grillo 



Dennis Grous Melvin Gudknecht Robert Gutmaker 



William Hamilton 



James Haney 



Robert Harlon 



Charles Hardesty 




Wearn Heinz 



Edward Hemschoot Edwin N. Hesbacher, Jr 



Charles Heyduk 



Walter Heyse 



Leadus Hicks 



Dennis Higgins 



Francis Higgins 




Alphonso Honesty 



Paul Hopkins 





Ralph Horky 



Olga Howard Br. J. Dominic Hull 



John Huscha 




Maximin Hussar 



Thomas Jaskel 



Herbert Jessel 



Dennis Johnson 





Dennis P. Johnson Kenneth Johnson 



Norman Johnson 




William Johnson 



Michael Johnston 




Robert Joya 



Joseph Judge 



Bernard Kane 




Edward Kane 



John Kanicsar 



Louis Kaniecki 





Robert Kawczynski John Keen 





William Keller 



Dennis J. Kelly 



George Kelly 




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John P. Kelly 



Robert Kenney 




Thomas Kilchesk 



Pat Killay 



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Raymond Kirsch 



Thomas Kline 



Kenneth Klinkner 



Gary Klopf 



Gregory Klosko 





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Robert Knuettel 



David Kochanasz 



Francis Kolpak 



Joseph Koons 



John Korostowski 




J.C. Korszniak 



Joseph Koziowski 



Joseph Kozole 



Martin Krause 




Gerald Krupa 



James Kuklinski 



Louis Lacatena 



Karen Landis 



Thomas Lasky 




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Anderson Lattimore Richard Lawinski 



William Lehner 



Richard Lentz 



Thomas Lewis 



George Lex 



Craig Lieske 



Edwin Lightkep 




Mark Mc Aleer 



Edward Mc Bride 



John Mc Call Robert Mc Colgan 



John Mc Cormick 




John Mc Donnell James Mc Fadden A. T. Mc Goldrick Stephen Mc Gonicle 



James Mc Gough 




John Mc Intyre 





John Mc Kenna Michael Mc Kenna Timothy Mc Laughlin 




Joseph Mc Lean Michael Mc Menamin 



John Mc Nee 




Thomas MacKay 



Daniel Magaskie 



James Magee 




Joseph Matis 




Joseph Mengacci 



John Middleton 






Douglas Miraglia 





Joseph Monaghan William Montellone 




John Moross 



Daniel Mullen 



William Mullen 




Thomas Murphy 



Timothy Murphy 




Michael Murray 



K. Denise Muth 




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John Motto 




William H. Mullen Daniel Murnane 





Edwin Murray 



James Murray 




George Naab 



Anthony Nardotti 




Frederick Nedl 



Lawrence Nedzbala 



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Richard Negro 



Richard Nisyla 





Thomas Niwinski 



Michael Nolan 




Michael Nuccio 




Anthony Nucera 





John O'Connor 



Chester Oczkowski 



James O'Donnell 





Thomas O'Donnell 



Gerald Oeste 





Robert Arthur O'Hara 



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Joseph O'Hare 






Joseph O'Neill, Jr. Joseph J. O'Neill 



Joseph Orlando 



Timothy Osborne 



Lawrence O Toole Robert Ousey 



Denise Owens 




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Paul Pantano 





James Osborne 





Peter Parrott 



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Lewis Pearlman 





Michael Pearlman 



Gary Pearlstein 



Michael Pekula 



John Penny 




John Pepe 



Arthur Perry 



John Perry 



Stanley Peterson 





Eugene Petrelli George Petrokubi 




Gary Piech Thomas Pilgernayer 




Thomas Piskorski 



Thomas Pistoria 



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John Rodgers 



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Gergory Rollins Wayne Romanczuk 




Anthony Romantini Mary Theresa Rooney 



Charles Roop 



Joseph Roscioli 



Robert Rose 




Robert Rotellini 



Daniel Ruggieri 



Glenn Russell 



Joseph T. Ryan 



Michael Saile 



George Saitta 



Chester Salwach 



Philip Samsel 



Anthony Santopolo 




Terrence Santovito Stanley Sasinowki Joseph Schaeffer Janis Schamenek 



John Schiavone 




Joseph Schmidt 



Robert Schoenberger Michael Schot 



Thomas Schreiber Thomas Schurtz 






Robert Schwaneberg John Schwartz 



James Schwegel 



Thomas Schweiker Peter Seccia 





Louis Sessinger 



Gregory Severn 



Mark Severns 



Robert Shannon 



William Shannon 




John Snyder Lawrence Souder 



Howard Spector 



Francis Spiecker 



Lewis Spiewak 




Thomas Sprague 



Herbert Stahl 



Gerard Stanley 



William Stark 



Norman Stayton 




Richard Stephan 



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Thomas Walsh 



Thomas P. Walsh 



Thomas Ward 



George Warrack 




Joseph Weber 



Robert Welsh 




Joseph Whalen 



Edward White 




Francis White 



James White 



Patrick White 



Martin Wiley 




James Wright 



Joanne Yanak 



Dennis Young 



Harold Young 



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Glenn Adair — 122 Sheraton Ave. Cinnaminson, 

N.J. - B.A. in Math Ed. 

Frank P. Albano — 253 So. Colorado St., Phila. 

Pa. — B.S in marketing. 

Jose Raul Alio — Valencia 20 Torrimar, Baya- 

mon, Puerto Rico — B.S. in Industrial Relations 

— Phi Kappa Theta — Industrial Relations Com- 
mission. 

Frank P. Alizzi - 725 Ellsworth St. Phila . Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Marketing. 
Eugene Allen — 672 Stratford Rd. Warminster, 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting Accounting Assoc. 
(Secretary 2) Accounting Board. 
Ronald J. Altieri — 1409 Bethlehem Pike, Flour- 
town. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assoc. — Theta Sigma Pi (Treasurer) 
Joseph G. Ambrosino — 273 E. Winona Ave.. 
Norwood, Pa. — B.A. in Marketing — Intramurals 
1.2, 3.4. 

Geoffrey T. Anders — 338 Ridge Pike, Lafayette 
Hill. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Chess Club 
(Pres. 1, 2. 3) - Conservative Club 1 - Young 
Republicans (Vice-Pres. 1,2)— Beta Alpha — 
Honor Accounting Fraternity, 3 — Accounting 
Departmental Board 2, 3. 
James J. Anderson — 1735 Loney St. Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Marketing. 

Philip Andrews — 5029 Loretto Ave.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Business. 

John R. Ansbro — 124 Walnut St. Ridgewood, 
N.J. — B.A. in Sociology — Intramurals. 
William Angelo Arena — 530 Bellevue Ave., 
Hammonton. N.J. — B.A. in History — College 
Union 1, 2, 3, 4 — C.U.C. Music Committee 
Chairman 3, 4 — C.U.C. Radio Sub-Committee 
Co-Chairman 3. 4 - ROTC Band 1 — ROTC 
Rifle team. 1. 

Robert Philip Argentine, Jr. — 1546 McFarland 
Rd.. Pittsburgh. Pa. — B.A. in Biology - AED 2, 
3, 4 - Yearbook 1,2 — Residence Halls Adviso- 
ry Board 2. 3, 4 — Residence Council — CHMN 
Relig, Grievance Committe 1 — CHMN House 
Committee 2. 3 - CHMN Special Committee 3 

— Weber Society 1 — Ad Hoc Committee for us- 
age of Hayman Hall 3. 

Leonard J. Armstrong, Jr. — 416 So. 24th St.. 

Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Management — 

Phi Kappa Theta (Secretary 3, 4). 

Michael Arricale — 17-26 Belfield Ave., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in English — Collegian News Editor 

3. 

Stephen John Arty — 2951 Disston St. Phila.. 

Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Mgt. 

Robert L. Ashmen — 3905 Ventnor Ave.. Atlantic 

City. N.J. — B.S. in Industrial Relations. 




Bernard Au - 5637 Wister St., Phila.. Pa. - 

B.A. in Physics — Newtonian Society. 

Michael J. Bachman — 205 Glendale Rd. Upper 

Darby. Pa. - B.A. in English. 

Joseph John Baillie - 7320 Hill Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology/Social Work — Sociology 
Club 1. 2. 3, 4 - St Gabriel's Club (Vice-Pres. 
1,2 — Pres. 3, 4) — Departmental Boards (Soci- 
ology 3). 

David J. Balcer — 1023 Gorman St. Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology. 

Charles A. Bandel. Ill - 77 W. Hillcrest Ave., 



Havertown, Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Michael F, Bannar — 154 Wesley Ave. Cherrry 
Hill, N.J. — B.A. in Political Science — Varsity 
Baseball (3 years). 

Jannie Barr — 1854 Nolan St., Phila., Pa. — B.A. 
in Sociology. 

Ralph Batman - 2129 Martindale Rd. Warring- 
ton, Pa. — B.A. in English — Theatre La Salle & 
The Masque 3, 4. 

Brian S. Bauer - 705 Wildell Rd., Drexel Hill, 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Pi Sigma Epsilon 3. 4 

— (Vice-Pres. 4) 

David E. Beavers — 111 Gordon Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in History — Ad Hoc Comm. for Student 
Teacher Evaluation '71 — Stenton Tutorial Pro- 
gram. 

James Joseph Bee — 2043 Bleigh St.. Phila.. 
Pa. - B.A. in Hist. 

John J. Bellus — 98 Kingwood Lane, Levittown, 
Pa. — B.A. in Economics — Economics Club. 
Robert J. Belutty — 634 So. Central Blvd.. Broo- 
mall, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Michael M. Bender — 519 Millbank Rd.. Upper 
Darby, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
John C. Benstead — 2 Smithfield Ave., Berlin, 
N.J. — B.S. in Accounting-Accounting Assoc, — 
Phi Kappa Theta — Beta Alpha, Honorary Ac- 
counting Fraternity. 

Frank J. Berlingis — 7430 Sandpiper PL, Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Psy. — Caisson Club (Secretary 
4). 

Joseph M. Berner — 4517 Oakmont St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Pol. Sci. — Young Republicans (3 
years) — Pol. Sci. Assoc. 3 — Youngs Ameri- 
cans for Freedom 3. 

Pochelle M. Bernstein - 6275 Kindred St. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in English 
John Best - 1037 E. Cushmore Rd. South- 
ampton, Pa. — B.A. in Psych. 
Dominic Thomas Biello — 1816 Ritner St. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History. 

Thomas W. Biester - 413 Burk Ave.. Ridley 
Park, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology - Psychology 
Club 2, 3, 4 - Psi Chi 3, 4 (Secretary) 
Frederick W. Blinn, Jr. - 1639 Fort Washington 
Ave. Maple Glen, Pa. - B.S. in Accounting - 
Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4 (Secretary 3) (Vice-Pres. 
4) — Accounting Assoc. 3,4. 
James H. Boerckel — 1821 Belfield Ave. Phila.. 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assoc. 
3. 4 — Intramural Sports 1, 2. 3, 4. 
John J. Bogansky — 32 Trail Rd. Levittown. Pa. 

— B.S. in Industry — Delta Sigma Pi. 

Alan Bond — Holly Dr. Oakwood Lake. Medford, 
N.J. — B.S. in Industrial Relations. 
William R. Bondiskey - 2131 Simon St. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law — St. Thomas More So- 
ciety. 

Bro. Thomas Bondra — 915 Spring Ave. Elkins 
Park. Pa. - B.A. in English Ed. 
Robert E. Bonner — 628 Boyer Rd. Cheltenham, 
Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta 2. 
3. 4 - Phi Alpha Beta 2. 3. 4 - Men's Chorale 1 

— La Salle Band 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Harry C. Bowers — 2264 Friendship St. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Pol. Science — 
James Mark Boyle — 17 Adams Ave. Bellmawr. 
N.J. - B.S. in Marketing. 

Paul F. Boyle - 5222 N. SyDenham St. Phila.. 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Robert Louis Boyle — 221 So Davis Ave. Audu- 
bon, N.J. — VS. in Math and Education — Base- 
ball 2, 3, 4 — Education Board. 
Bro. Thomas J. Breighner. F.S.C. — 915 
Spring Ave.. Elkins Park, Pa. — B.A. in Theo- 
logy. 

Joseph W. Breitner - 2930 N. Mascher St. 
Phila., Pa. - B.A. in English — Collegian. News 



73 



Staff Writer 1,2,3.4 — Assistant to the Editor 2 

- Managing Editor 3, 4 - Student Volunteer 
Corps 3. 4 - St. Gabriel's Club 3. 4 - English 
Dept. Board 3. 

John B. Brennan — 1003 Chandler St. Phila.. 

Pa. — B.S. in Biology 

Joseph V. Briggman - 1617 West End Ave. 

Pottsville, Pa. — B.A. in Chemistry - Chymian 

Society 1. 2, 3 - Photographer, Collegian 1 - 

Photography Editor, Collegian 2 — Residence 

Council 3 — Student Advisor 3. 

Edmond J. Brodbine — 3000 Disston St Phila.. 

Pa. — B.A. in History - Italian Club. 

Craig Edward Brooks — 337 Powder Horn Rd.. 

Fort Washington. Pa. — B.A. in History Ed. — 

Phi Kappa Theta Fratenity. 

Donald F. Browne — 5113 Garfield Ave. Pen- 

nsauken, N.J. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Hubert W. Brucker - 7732 Ardleigh St. Phila.. 

Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Rifle Team 

1 - Veterans Club 1. 2, 3 (Vice-Pres. 68-69. 

Pres. 69-70. 

James E. Bruno — 8303 Strahlie PI. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Mkt. 

Joseph R. Bucci — 37 Bysher Ave. Flourtown, 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Tau Kappa Epsilon 
1. 2, 3. 4 — Psi Chi Treasurer — Psychology 
Club Social Chairman. 

John F. Burghardt - 539 Wiltshire Rd. Upper 
Darby. Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Mgmt — Society 
Advancement Mgmt. — Collegian Photographer. 
Michael D. Burke — 8500 Fulton Ave. Margate. 
N.J. — B.A. in Pre-Law. 




Joseph M. Cacchio — 9517 Frankford Ave. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law — St. Thomas 
More Society — Student Affairs Comm. — Vol- 
unteer Corps 3. 4 — Education Society — Cai- 
son Activities. 

Joseph Calabrese — 39 Chatham Rd. Upper 
Darby. Pa. — B.S. in Math. 
Richard Caldarola — 318 E. Ruby Dr. Palisades 
Park. N.J. — B.A. in Pre-Law — Residence 
Council — Dorm Rep. 3. 

Michael Patrick Canavan — 30 Valley View Dr.. 
Dover, N.J. — B.A. in Math — Pi Sigma Epsilon 
3.4- Tennis Team 2, 3, Co-captain 4. 
Timothy Caniz — 1930 N. Howard St. Phila.. Pa. 
— B.S. in Marketing. 

John J. Cantwell — 134 E. Main St. Girardville. 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Marketing Assn. 1, 2, 
3, 4 — Veterans Club 3, 4 — Intramurals 1. 2, 3, 
4, 

Louis Cape cci — 8434 Torresdale Ave. Phila., 
Pa. - B.S. in Biology - Phi Alpha Beta - Alpha 
Epsilon Delta — Medical Honor Society. 
Christina T. Capella - 1110 Welsh Rd. Phila., 
Pa. - B.A. in English — Weber Society Vice 
President 3. 4. 

Chester J. Capinski Jr. - 555 Keebler Rd.. King 
of Prussia. Pa. — B.A. in Sociology — Soccer 3. 
4. 

Francis E. Capista — 321 Llandrillo Rd. Bala 
Cynwyd, Pa. — B.S. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 3. 4 - Phi Alpha Beta 3. 4. 
Joseph Capista — 331 Walnut St., Clifton Hgts . 
Pa. — B.S. in Biology — lota Alpha Beta Secre- 
tary 3. 4. 

Thomas Capizzi — 4337 E. Cheltenham Ave.. 
Phila.. Pa. - B.A. in Math - Kappa Mu Epsilon 
2. Treasurer 3. President 4 — Math Departmen- 
tal Board 3 - KME Newsletter Editor 3. 4. 
Richard M. Capper — M1-12 Ashwood Apts.. 
Warminster. Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Veterans 



Club 3 — Marketing Assn. Treasurer 3. 
George F. Carbone — 6037 N. Marvine St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 
Michael Card — 611 Catler Ave.. Maple Shade, 
N.J. — B.A. in Psychology — LaSalle Masque 2, 
3. 

Francis J. Carr — 947 Anchor St., Phila., Pa. — 
B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 
Francis Carty — 69 Frances Ave., Sharon Hill, 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Crew 1 . 
Lawrence P. Carugnp — 105 E. Broad St., Palm- 
yra, N.J. — B.S. in Industrial Management. 
Joseph Caruso — 1521 S. 13th St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Accounting — Acccounting Assn. 3 — 
Beta Alpha Secretary — Accounting Departmen- 
tal Board 2, 3. 

John G. Casey — 3826 Dartmouth PI., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Joseph William Casey — 905 Turner Ave., Dre- 
xel Hill, Pa. — B.A. in Biology — lota Alpha Beta 
2, Treasurer 3, President 4 — Departmental 
Board 1 . 

John T. Cassidy — 31 Park Ave.. Oreland, Pa. — 
B.S. in Marketing — Tau Kappa Epsilon. 
Manus R. Cassidy - 7237 Eastwood St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology 

Charles Caucci — Black Horse Pike, McKee. 
N.J — B.A. in Pre-Law — Residence Council — 
Italian Club — Athletic Comm. — Pinochle Club 
Champions. 

Edward Philip Ceresini — 816 Locust St., Leba- 
non, Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Management — In- 
tramurals - R.O.T.C. 

Joseph A. Cesarz — 1925 Fairview St.. Reading, 
Pa. — B.A. in Political Science. 
John Wong Chang - 2262 N. Howard St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in General Business 
Robert Chesterton — 5939 A St.. Phila., Pa. — 
B.A. in Marketing — Italian Club. 
Charles Chew — 140 Dickinson St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting. 

Robert Christian — 649 Sherman Rd., 
Springfield, Pa. — B.A. in Economics. 
Haresh Chugani — 112-A Austin Rd., Kowloon, 
Hong Kong — B.S. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon 
Delta — LaSalle International Club. 
Starlene Ciaverelli - 2119 McKinley St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Treasurer of the jun- 
ior Class — Cheerleaders Captain. 
Brother Michael Cimerola — 915 Spring Ave., 
Elkins Park, Pa. — B.A. in Russian-French — La- 
Salle in Europe — Library Comm. 4 — Language 
Board 4. 

Stanley E. Cias Jr. — 95 Ivy Ln., Lansdale, Pa. — 
B.S. in Accounting. 

William Clark - 1504 Howell St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Pre-Law — Newtonian Society 2, 3. 
Jonathan Handy Cofer — 3918 Cambridge 
Street, Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Presi- 
dent's Guard Drill Team. 

Robert Cohen- 6637 Oakland St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Board 3, 4 — 
Collegian 3 - Beta Alpha 3, 4 - Caisson Club 3 

— President's Guard 3. 

James Anthony Colella — 53 Macintosh Rd., Le- 
vittown, Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Bernard F. Coley — 748 Harper Ave., Drexel 
Hill, Pa. -B.A. in Pre-Law. 
William J. Collier - 5917 Crystal St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting. 

Richard James Colom — 903 Shank Rd., Dover, 
Del. — B.A. in Psychology — Concert Choir 1, 
Treasurer 2 & 3, 4. 

Joseph John Colosimo — 1725 S. Edgewood 
St.. Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations-In- 
dustrial Relations Commission 2, 3, 4. 
James Patrick Concannon — 2013 S. Simpson 
St., Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Howitzer 
2 — Recondos 2. 

John Patrick Connolly III - 5501 Wister St.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in History — Sociology. 
James Connor — 5245 N. 15th St., Phila., Pa. — 
B.A. in History Education — Phi Kappa Theta. 
Kevin J. Connor — 564 Bellevue Ave., Trenton, 
N.J. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 4 

— Assistant Dorm Director 3 — Beta Alpha 3, 4 

— Residence Council 3, 4. 



Margaret R. Connors — 252 Friendship Rd., 
Drexel Hill, Pa. — B.A. in History. 
Vincent J. Conway — 230 Marshall Ave., Col- 
lingdale. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting Basketball 1 

— Intramurals 2, 3. 

Michael J. Corey - 1404 S. Allison St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law — Assistant Trainer 1, 2, 
3. 

Roberta M. Costa — 4024 Teesdale St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English — Collegian Managing 
Editor. 

James A. Costanzo — 3846 N. 6th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Chemistry — Intramural Football 
and Basketball. 

Donald J Courtney — 411 Kenmore Rd., Haver- 
town, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Intramurals 4. 
Ted Crawford — 120 Woodhill Lane. Media, Pa. 

— B.A. in English — Collegian. 

Gregory J. Crosby — 5930 Hammond Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 3, 4 — II Circolo LaSalliano 1 . 2, 3, 4. 
Al V. Cummings. Ill - 6434 Limekiln Pike, 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Student 
Congress 1 — Football Club 1 — Water Polo 
Club 2,4- Collegian 1 . 2, Editor 3 & 4. 




William Daly - 476 Manheim St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Biology — Student Government Treas. 1 

— Interfraternity Council 2, 3 — Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 2, 3. 4 — Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, Pres. 
4. 

John J. Dando — 8110 Revere St.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Relations. 
Gregory L. Davis - 3439 Shelmire St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Keith Paul Davis — 1003 Huff Ave., Manville, 
N.J. — B.S. in Marketing. 

David Dawson — 106 Hampden Ave.. Narberth, 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Sam DeMartino — 1403 Midmeadow Rd., Tow- 
son, Md. — B.A. in Biology. 
John DeMasi — 2046 Derereaux Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Radio Station 
3.4. 

Maureen Elizabeth Denny - 283 Bickley Rd., 
Glenside, Pa. - B.A. in English. 
James J. Devine — 823 Greenwich St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Spanish Education — Education 
Society. 
John DeVirgiliis - 1520 S. 13th St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science. 

Charles F. Di Cicco - 3686 Stanton St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing Baseball Team. 
Robert Edward Dietz — 1308 Clara Ave., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Academic Af- 
fairs — Residence Council — Dramatics. 
Dante DiMarizio, Jr. — 1414 Boyer Blvd., Norris- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law — Howitzer 2, 3, 4 

— Caisson Club 3, 4 - Recondos 1, 2, 3, 4 — 
Football Team 1. 

Bro. William DiPasquale, F.S.C. — 915 Spring 
Ave., Elkins Park, Pa. — B.A. in History. 
Edward John Dobbins — 109 Tree St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in General Business — Intramural 
Basketball. Football, Baseball 1, 2, 3. 
Charles T. Dolan - 2406 Elizabeth Rd., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Gretchen H. Dollenberg - 3921 Eden St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Adrian James Donaghue — 344 Gibbons Rd., 
Springfield, Pa. — B.S. in Biology — Theta Kap- 
pa Epsilon. 

Francis I. Donahue — 19 Dewey Rd., Chelten- 
ham. Pa. — B.A. in Biology. 
Vincent Donnelly - 1523 E. Luzerene St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Chemistry — Chemian Society 3, 
4. 

William F. Donohue — 141 Nagle Ave., New 
York, N.Y. — B.S. in General Business - Delta 
Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4. 
James J. Donovan- 2874 Welsh Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology. 

74 



Thomas M. Dooley — 1648 E. Lycoming St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. College Union 
Committees — International Club. 
William Dorsey — 912 White Horse Pk., Oak- 
land, N.J. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Dennis G. Dougherty - 2655 Gerritt S St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Psychology. 
Bernard Dowling — 3024 Crescent Ave., La- 
fayette Hill, Pa. - B.A. in History Phi Sigma Ep- 
silon. 

William J. Doyle, Jr. - 1624 Howell St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Veteran's 
Club 2 — Rules and By-Laws Committee Chair- 
man 3. 

John Drabyak - 8809 Revere St.. Phila.. Pa. — 
B.S, in Accounting — Sigma Phi Lambda Secre- 
tary 3, 4. 

William McCavock Drayton - 604 Maple La., 
Flourtown. Pa. — B.A. in Economics. 
Paul G. Driscoll — 204 Salaignac St., Phila., Pa. 
— B.S. in Accounting. 

Francis Clifton Drury - 8330 Wyton Rd., Tow- 
son, Md. — B.A. in Biology — Crew 1, 2, 4 — 
Residence Council 2, 3 — Alpha Epsilon Delta 
3, 4. 

Timothy W. Duerr — 1459 Makefield Rd., Morris- 
vi lie. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Intermurals 1, 
2. 3, 4 — Phi Sigma Epsilon. 
Joseph Owen Dunn - 728 Belfield Ave., Drexel 
Hill, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting 
Paul E. Duvoisin - 108 Golf Rd., Darby, Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Management — lota Kappa 
Theta — S.A.M. - I.F.C. Secretary 3. 
Francis X. Dillon - 113 Anchor St.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Pre-Law — Ring Committee 3 — Class 
Secretary 3 — Freshman Orientation 3, 4 — St. 
Thomas More Society 4 — Student Govt. Assn. 
Secretary 4 — Chairman of Open House 4. 




George J. Edelmann — 2016 Sussex Blvd., 
Broomall, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Charles E. Edwards, Jr. — 3541 Primrose Rd., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 
Daniel E. Ellis - 1130 E. Woodlawn Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Concert Choir 1, 2, 
3,4. 

George Peter Endrigian — 227 Barclay Circle. 
Cheltenham, Pa. — B.S. in Psychology — Psy- 
chology Club — College Union Committees. 
Rosalyn Epstein - 9001 Cargill La., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in English — Education. 

Damien Joseph Everly — 6300 N. 7th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Latin 

Robert S. Fanning — 936 Virginia Ave., Lang- 
home, Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Management. 
Edward Farrell — 70 Vanderveer Ave., Holland, 
Pa. — B.A. in English. 

Patrick E. Farrell — 1312 Devereaux Ave., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Tennis 2, 
Co-captain 3 & 4. 

George Fedorijczuk - 4347 N. 8th St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Ukranian Club 
Treasurer. 

Richard A. Feeney III - 244-36 88th Ave., Belle- 
rose, N.Y. — B.A. in Political Science — Resi- 
dence Council 3 — Intramurals Football, Soft- 
ball, and Basketball. 
James Fenerty — 531 W. Fisher Ave., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science — Political Science 
Assn. 2, 3. 4. 

John C. Fenningham - 9777 Clark St.. Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in History 

Joseph F. Ferris. Ill - 34 S. 14th St., Darby. Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology. 

Dennis M. Field - 2849 Disston St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Industrial Management. 



Louis Figari — 125 Closter Dock Rd., Closter, 
N.J- — B.S. in General Business — Sigma Phi 
Lambda- 
Harry J. Fini, Jr. - 2539 South Robinson St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in English — Howitzer — Re- 
condos - ROTC Newsletter Editor 3. 4. 
Richard J. Finkenhofer — 324 E. Albanus St.. 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in English. 
Thomas M. Finnegan — 199 W. Linton St., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Carol A. Fisher — 248 S. Camac St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Business. 

James J. Fisher — 242 Chelten Ave., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A in English. 

Joseph James Fleming - 4715 Worth St.. Phila.. 
Pa. — B.A. in Spanish. 

Paul Richard Flesher - 89 Saratoga Rd., Strat- 
ford. N.J. — B.A. in Pre-Law lota Kappa Theta. 
Alan Rick - 3279 Pebblewood La.. Dresher, Pa. 

— B.A. in History, 

Raymond A. Folen — 2402 New Albany Rd.. 
Cinnaminson, N.J. — B.A. in Psychology — Psy- 
chology Club 4 — Fabrican Society 1 — Colle- 
gian Associate Editor 2 — Phi Kappa Theta 1, 2. 
3,4. 

Edward R. Fox, Jr. - 818 Blossom Rd.. Warm- 
inster, Pa — B.A. in Chemistry — President's 
Guard 1 — Chyman Society 1, 2, 3, 4 — Colle- 
gian 1, 2. 3. Managing Editor. 4 Editor. 
John Fox — 151 Walnut La.. Ambler. Pa. — B.A. 
in Psychology. 

Mary Ellen Fox — 512 Bradford Rd., Oreland, 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Club — 
Departmental Board. 

Joseph T. Freeth, Jr. — 760 Jenkintown Rd.. El- 
kins Park, Pa, — B.S. in Marketing — In- 
tramurals — Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3. 4. 
Christopher Mitchell Frey — 4 Parkway Place, 
Holmdel, N.J. — B A in Mathematics. 
Andrew Scott Friedman — 7962 Thouson Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in History — Honors Program 
4. 

Joseph A. Fugaro, Jr. — 1304 Merrimac Rd., 
Camden, N.J. — BS. in Psychology. 
Nicholas J. Fuhr — 1034 Loney St., Phila., Pa. — 
B.A. in Sociology- 




Harry Albert Gabrielli — 811 Porter St., Easton, 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Intramurals 1,2, 3, 
4 - Baseball 1 - Phi Sigma Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 
Treasurer 4 — Accounting Assn. Representative 
3. 

George Michael Gagnon — 23 Locust Rd., 
Bordentown. N.J. — B.A. in History — In- 
tramurals 1, 2. 3, 4 — Yearbook. 
Salvatore Gambino — 3469 St. Vincent St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Collegian 3, 
4. 

Anthony G Galen, III - 2127 Stevens St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History — Dean's List. 
Eugene A. Gartman - 2237 46th St.. Pennsau- 
ken. N.J. -B.A. in Math. 

Harold N. Gerhart, Jr. — 200 Hudsondale St., 
Weatherly, Pa — B.S. in Accounting — Sigma 
Phi Lambda. 

William J. Gerhart - 5411 N. Fairhill St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A in Sociology — Chorale 1, Secretary 
3 — Concert Choir President 3. 
Robert Giaccio — 2323 Fairway Rd.. Huntington 
Valley, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Intramurals. 
Jeffrey F. Gibbons - 1325 New York Ave., Cape 
May, N.J. — Psychology Club 3 — Intramural 
Basketball 2 

Harvey W. Giberson, Jr. — 116 N. Princeton 
Ave.. Ventnor, N.J. — B.S. in Marketing — Mar- 
keting Assn. Treasurer 4 — Pi Sigma Epsilon 
Vice-President 3, Executive Board 4. 
Charles M. Gill — 1316 Hamilton Ave., Trenton. 
N.J. - B.A. in Math. 

Walter J. Gill. Jr. - 926 West Boulevard, Hart- 
ford, Conn. — B.A. in English — Education — 
Drug Comm. 



Anthony J. Gillespie — 4006 S Marner Rd., La- 
fayette Hill, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Cross 
Country 1, 2, 4. 

James Nicholas Giordano, Jr. - 824 N. 64th 
St., Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Economics — Econom- 
ics Club — Phi Kappa Theta. 
Thomas J. Giordano - 2418 S. 16th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English 

Louis D. Giosso - 6217 Lawndale St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in French — Education. 
John A. Glemb - 3028 Falls St.. Niagara Falls, 
N.Y. — B.S. in Accounting — Basketball 1 — 
Baseball 4. 

Thomas W. Gluth - 23 Waverly Drive West. 
East Brunswick, N.J. — B.A. in English — La- 
Salle in Europe 3 — Masque 2, 4. 
Shawn M. Glynn — 505 Hemlock Rd.. Flour- 
town, Pa. — B.A in Psychology — Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 
Edie S. Goldberg - 1264 Stirling St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in English — Education — Education 
Club 3. 

Gilbert J. Golding - 7838 Provident St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Track. 

James R. Goodbody — 1600 Emerson St., 

Phila.. Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Basketball & 

Baseball Intramurals. 

William Gordon — B.S. in Accounting. 

Donald E. Gough — 728 Disston St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in French Education — Men's Choir 2, 3, 
4 — French Club 1, 2, 3, 4 — French Honor Fra- 
ternity — Student International Assn. 3, 4. 
bMichael M. Graboyes — 823 Dover Rd., Phila. 
Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 

Gerard A. Graham - 6131 N. Fairhill St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law. 

John A. Graziani, Jr. - 4421 Howell St., Phila.. 

Pa. — B.A. in English. 

James D. Greaves — 416 Belmont Dr., Cherrry 

Hill, N.J. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 

Assn. 3, 4 — Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4. 

Emile Geraro Greco — 465 Summit Ave., Phila., 

Pa. — B.S. in General Business — The Masque 

3, 4 - Crew Team 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Robert A. Greco — 255 Lawrence Rd., Broo- 
mall, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology. 
Thomas Dean Greig — 12 Plymouth Court. Mt. 
Holly, N.J. — B.A. in Political Science — Presi- 
dent's Guard 1 — Colllege Union Committees 1, 
2, 3, 4 — Faculty Student Judiciary 3 — Chap- 
lain Search Committee 3. 

John H. Griesemer, Jr. - 861 N. Hale St., Potts- 
town, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Yearbook 
Staff. 
Joseph S. Grillo — Duerer St., Egg Harbor, N.J. 

— B.S. in General Business — Track Team. 
James B. Gross — 1098 Jeffrey Dr., South- 
ampton, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Dennis J. Grous — 3322 Fordham Rd., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta — 
Phi Alpha Beta Treasurer 4. 
Kathleen M. Grady — 438 Winchester Ave., New 
York, N.Y. - B.A. in English - Student Affairs 
Committee 3 — Women's Basketball Team 3, 4 

— Resident's Advisory Board 3. 4. 

Melvin R. Gudknecht — Yorkshire Arms Apts. B- 

4, Bulrington. NJ. — B.S. in Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Robert F. Gutmaker - 6023 Drexel Rd., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Physics and Mathematics — New- 
tonian Society Vice-President 4 — Academic Af- 
fairs Committee 4 — Kappa Mu Epsilon. 




Robert J. Hall — 3513 Kensington Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Veteran's Club. 
William J. Hamilton - 2952 N. Reese St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Finance and Accounting — Ac- 
counting Board 3. 

James Joseph Haney, III — 117 Russell Dr., 
Southampton, Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha 
Epsilon Delta 3.4- Phi Alpha Beta 2, 3, 4. 
Robert J. Hanlon — 3858 Whitman Rd., Hunt- 



75 



ington Valley. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Charles Hardesty — 1820 Webster La.. Ambler. 
Pa. — B A. IN Psychology. 

Mark E. J. Harding — 329 Brookline Blvd., Hav- 
ertown, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. — Beta Alpha. 

John Harris — 279 Lemonte St., Phila., Pa, — 
B.A. in Spanish — Education — Concert Choir 2, 
3. 

James F. Hart, III - 7 Nenagh Dr., Wilmington, 
Del. — B.S. in Accounting — Crew 1 , 2. 3. 
Bernadette R. Harvey — 2333 Mt. Carmel Ave., 
Glenside, Pa. — B.A. in English. 
Thomas J. Haverluk - 2823 Orthodox St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Finance — Finance Assn. 
George F. Hayhoe, F.S.C. — 915 Spring Ave,. 
Elkins Park, Pa. — B.A. in English - Phi Alpha 
Theta 3. 4 — Academic Affairs Committee 4 — 
Departmental Board 1, 2, 3, 4 — Weber Society 
2, President 3, 4. 

James E. Hayman — 14 Scarsdale Ave., Tren- 
ton, N.J. — B.S. in Finance — Soccer Team 2, 3. 
Captain 4. 

Edward F. Healy - 118 W. Chestnut Ave. Metu- 
chen, N.J. — B.A. in Mathematics — Intramurals 
1.2. 3. 

Wearn D. Heinz - 4001 Lawndale St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History — College Union Com- 
mittees 1, 2. 3. 4. 

Edward R. Hemschoot — 63 Princeton Rd.. Fair- 
haven, N.J. — B.A. in English — Phi Kappa 
Theta. 

E. N. Hesbacher, Jr. - 5925 Greene St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Management — Chairman Public 
Relations, Veterans' Club 4, Explorer 4. 
Walter J. Heyse — 417 West Ave., Wayne. Pa. — 
B.S. in Accounting — Intramural Basketball 2. 3. 
Leadus Hicks - 2432 N. Broad St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Political Science. 

Dennis W. Higgins — 48 N. Avon Dr., Claymont, 
Del — B.A. in Psychology — Track 1, 2, 3, 4 — 
Orpheus 1. 2, 3, 4. 

Francis Higgins — 120 Wilson Ave.. Havertown, 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Intramurals 1. 2, 3, 4. 
Michael D. Hill - 5715 Wister St., Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Social Work. 

Leonard P. Hindsley — 234 Christiana St., 
Brooklawn. N.J. — B.A. in German — Men's 
Chorale — German Club — LaSalle In Europe. 
Alphonso Honesty — 413 E. Rittenhouse St.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Paul W. Hopkins - 824 Christian St., Phila.. Pa. 
— B.A. in History. 

Ralph E. Horky - 6350 Greene St., Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Sociology. 

Olga Olivia Howard - 25 Woodstock Dr.. New- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in English — The Masque 3, 4. 
Bill Hull - 5316 Wayne Ave.. Phila., Pa. - B.A. 
in Political Science. 

Bro. John Dominic Hull F.C. - 7720 Doe Lane. 
Phila., Pa. - B.A. in History — Education - 
Fencing Club 2 -■ II Circolo Lasalliano 2, 3. 
John Ivan Huscha — 605 Concord Ave., Tren- 
ton, N.J. — B.A. in Philosophy and Russian — 
Russian Club 1 . 2, Secretary 3, 4. 
Maximin C. Hussar — 1 W. Main St., Fleetwood. 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 




Paul Vincent Isicratz — 2845 Fanshawe St.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — St. 
Thomas More Society 2, Treasurer 3, President 
4 — Political Science Assn. 2, 3. 4. 




Franklin James — 3165 Pikertown Rd . Warring- 
ton, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psychology 
Club. 
Thomas J. Jaskel — 1425 Corry Ave., Cornwell 



Heights, Pa. — B.A. in Political Science. 
H. Gary Jessel — 3241 Tyson Ave., Phila., Pa. — 
B.S. in Marketing — Soccer. 
Dennis P. Johnson - 11744 Academy Place, 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Kenneth W. Johnson - 5217 N. Howard St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations. 
Michael Johnson - P.O. Box 5151, Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Finance — Caisson Club — Finance 
Assn. 

Norman L. Johnson - 1749 W. Thompson St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Psychology. 
William R. Johnson - 7845 Forrest Ave., Phila., 
Pa. - B.A. in English and Theology — Veteran's 
Club President 3, 4. 

Michael D. Johnston - 61 N. Passaic Ave., 
Chatham, N.J. — B.S. in Finance — Caisson 
Club — Finance Assn. 

Eric Jones - 557 E. Church La., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Management — Black Stu- 
dent's Union 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Robert Joya - 102 Laurelbrook Rd., Cherry Hill, 
N.J. — B.A. in Sociology — Baseball Team 4 — 
Intramural Football and Basketball 1, 2,3. 4. 
Joseph J. F. Judge - 2111 E. Stella St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Caisson 
Club 3. 4 — lota Kappa Theta 1, 2. 3. 4. 




Bernard J. Kane — 104 Snyder Ave., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Club. 
Edward T. Kane — 6924 Roosevelt Blvd., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Industrial 
Relations Commission President 4. 

John R. Kanicsar — 212 Tyler Rd., King of 
Prussia, Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Veter- 
an's Club Director 1 & 2, 3, 4. 
Robert M. Kawczynski — 7110 Valley Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. 2 — Beta Alpha 3. 
Jack M. Keen - 3124 Hellerman St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 3 — 
Phi Kappa Theta Treasurer 3. 

John P. Keenan — 893 Fifth St., Ocean City, 

N.J. — B.S. in Economics — Economics Club 3, 

President 4 — Rifle Team 1 , 2. 

William F. Keller - 334 Emily St.. Phila., Pa. - 

B.S. in General Business. 

Dennis James Kelly - 3843 Oak Dr., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology. 

George E. Kelly, Jr. — 908 Longshore St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. — 
Student Government — Academic Affairs Assn. 

— Beta Alpha. 

John Paul Kelly — 210 N. Wayne Ave., Wayne, 

Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Crew 3. 

Robert V. Kenney — 180 Cold Spring Rd., Syos- 

set. N.Y. — B.A. in Political Science — Yearbook 

4 — Political Science Assn. 1, 2. 

John F. Kent — 2576 June Ave., Cornwell 

Heights, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Football 1 

— Tau Kappa Epsilon — Student Council 1 . 
Dennis Patrick Kerr — 524 Lesington La., Nor- 
ristown, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psychology 
Club Treasurer. 

Thomas S. Kilcheski - 4703 Howell St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta — 

Phi Alpha Beta. 

Raymond P. Kirsch - 2232 Yelland St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in Math. 

Thomas A. Kline - 2010 Fulmer St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting. 

Kenneth Klinkner - 902 Gilham St.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in English — College Union Comm. 
Gary Francis Klopf — 2404 Hayden Dr., Silver 
Spring, Md. — B.A. in Political Science — Year- 
book — LaSalle in Europe 3. 

Gregory Klosko — 48 Ailanthus La., Levirtown, 

Pa. — B.A. in English. 

Robert V. Knuettel - 446 W. Blavis St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

David S. Kochanasz — 806 Sixth St., Whitehall. 

Pa. — B.A. in English. 



Francis J. Kolpak - 425 E. Church Rd., King of 
Prussia, Pa. — B.A. in Chemistry — Chymian So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3. President 4 — Residence Council 
3. 

Joseph V. Koons — 430 E. Lloyd St., Shenan- 
doah, Pa. — B.A. in History/Education — Veter- 
an's Club 3,4. 

John Korostowski, Jr. — 333 Essex Ave., Cherry 
Hill, N.J. — B.A. in History — Yearbook — In- 
tramurals. 

Joseph C. Korszniak — Ridge Pike, Eagleville, 
p a . _ B.A. in Spanish — Spanish Club Secre- 
tary/Treasurer 3. 

Joseph J. Koziowski - 222 Powell Rd., 
Springfield, Pa. — B.S. in General Business — 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3. 

Joseph J. Kozole — 6304 Battersby St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Basketball In- 
tramurals 1 — Beta Alpha. 
Martin R. Krause — 7739 Lycoming Ave., Mel- 
rose Park, Pa. — B.A. in Philosophy. 
John A. Kriza — 2408 Olcott Ave., Ardmore. Pa. 
— B.S. in Marketing. 

Gerald F. Krupa - 415 Pine St., West Reading, 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

James A. Kulinski - 4404 Csxter St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics/Physics — The Mas- 
que Kappa Mu Epsilon 1 , 2, 3, 4. 




Louis S. Lacatena — 109 Alpha Ave., Ashland. 
N.J. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Karen Lee Landis — 35 Hillcrest Ave., Chalfont, 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Thomas R. Lasky — 11624 Kelvin Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 

Anderson J. Lattimore - 6114 Haverford Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Economics — Black Stu- 
dent Union 1,2- Caisson Club 3, 4 - R.O.T.C. 
1 , 2, 3, 4 - Phi Kappa Theta 2, 3, 4. 
William E. Lehner - 5219 Snydenham St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon 
Delta — lota Alpha Beta Vice-President 4. 
John S. Lench — 40 Swartzel Dr., Middletown, 
N.J. — B.S. in Economics. 
Richard F. Lentz — 1391 Jolly Rd.. Norristown, 
Pa. — B.S. in Earth Science — Men's Chorale 1, 
2 — Philadelphia Geological Society 3, 4. 
Thomas E. Lewis - 353 Springvalley Rd., 
Springfield, Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
George D. Lex - 429 W. George St.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Marketing. 

Craig Alan Lieske - 44 Ridge Rd.. Kinnelon. 
N.J. - B.A. in Mathematics - Sigma Phi Lam- 
bda — R.O.T.C. — Caisson Club. 
Edwin W. Lightkep - 4012 Hartel St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting 

Francis W. LiPira — 1004 Kirkcolm Rd., Towson, 

Md. -B.A. in Math. 

Robert J. Lockwood - 5938 B St., Phila., Pa. - 

B.S. in Marketing. 

John W. Loftus — 1800 Emerson St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Business — Tau Kappa Epsilon 3, 4 — 
Varsity Baseball 3, 4. 

Edward Long — 82 Grand Place, Kearny. N.J — 
B.A. in English. 

Thomas J. Loughrey - 4617 Bleigh Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English. 

Raymond Lubiejewski — 3034 Thompson St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Math/Education. 
James A. Lynch, III - 21 E. Mercer Ave., Haver- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Political 
Science Assn. 2, 3, 4 — St. Thomas More So- 
ciety 3, 4. 

Michael Lynch - 6543 N. 28th St., Arlington, 
Va. - B.A. in Psychology — R.O.T.C. Drill Team 
1, 2, 3 - The Masque 3, 4. 
Vincent Lynch - 36 E. Church Rd., Norristown, 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology — Sociology Club 1, 2, 
3, 4 — St. Gabriel's Club 1 , 2. 




Kevin W McAleer — 1939 Osbourne Ave., Wil- 
low Grove, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Mark G. McAleer - 6300 N. 7th St., Phila., Pa. 
- B.A. in Social Work - St. Gabriel's Club 2, 3. 
Edward McBride. Jr. - 276 W. Nedro, Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

John J. McCall - 5005 N. 16th St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in History and Philosophy. 
Robert J. McColgan — 2 Webster Ave., Kearny, 
N.J. — B.S. in Marketing — Marketing Assn. — 
St. Thomas More Society — Intramural Football. 
John J. McCormick - 3456 N. Lee St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 
James T. McFadden — 3323 Morning Glory Rd., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Anthony McGoldrick - 4218 Garrett Rd., Drexel 
Hill, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics. 
Stephen L. McGonigle — 7700 Henry Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Baseball 3 — 
Academic Affairs Comm. 2, 3 — Marketing Assn. 
2, 3, President 4 — Departmental Board 2, 3, 
Chairman 4. 

James P. McGough — 956 Madison Ave., South- 
ampton, Pa. — B.A. in German — German Club 
3- Phi Kappa Theta 2, 3, 4. 
Gerald P. McGovern - 2839 Chatham St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. — Tau Kappa Delta. 
Thomas P. McHatton — 17 Oxford Ave., Strat- 
ford, N.J. — B.A. in Sociology — Departmental 
Board 3 — Sociology Club 2, President 3. 
John F. Mclnerney — 409 Bruce Terrace, 
Cherry Hill. N.J. - B.A. in Psychology - Phi 
Kappa Theta 2 — Departmental Board 3 — Psy- 
chology Club 3, 4 — Psi Chi President 4. 
John F. Mclntyre - 2938 N. Howard St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English and Education. 
John W. McKenna — 7026 Cottage St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History and Education. 
Michael McKenna - 6365 Edmund St., Phila., 
Pa. - B.A. in English — Weber Society 2, 3, 4. 
Timothy J. McLaughlin - 6201 Croften St., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Biology — lota Alpha Beta. 
Joseph J. McLean — 672 Old Schoolhouse La., 
Springfield. Pa. — B.S. in Business — In- 
tramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Michael J. McMenamin — 9 Willowbrook Ave.. 
Lansdowne, Pa. — B.S. in Management. 
John A. McNee — 69 Monmouth Ave., Leon- 
ardo, N.J. — B.S. in Marketing — Baseball 1 — 
Intramural Football 1. 2 — Varsity Basketball 
Cheerleader 2, 3 — Marketing Assn. 4 — Sigma 
Phi Lambda 1. 2, 3. 4 — Shuffleboard at Frank's 
in Germantown. 

Bernard J. McNichol - 1391 Spruce St. DeKalb 
Park, Norristown, Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Rela- 
tions — Industrial Relations Comm. 1, 2, 3, 4 — 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3. 4. 
Bro. Thomas H. McPhillips, FSC — 915 Spring 
Ave.. Elkins Park, Pa. - B.A. in Biology. 
Thomas J. McTear - 1265 Hilltop Rd., South- 
ampton, Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Phi Alpha 
Beta. 
Harry Maccord - 1919 Chandler St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science. 

John R. MacDonald — 844 Mason Ave., Drexel 

Hill, Pa. - B.S. in Marketing. 

Paul MacDonald - 110 Elm Ave., Glenside, Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Assn. Presi- 
dent — Theta Sigma Pi — Intramurals. 
Thomas C. Mackay - 2617 DeKalb Pk., Norris- 
town. Pa. — B.S. in Business Administration. 
Daniel J. Magaskie - 127 East Spurzheim St.. 
Shamokin. Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Pi Sigma 
Epsilon President — Intramurals. 

James Magee — 201 Hadden Ave., Collings- 
wood, N.J. — B.S. in Economics — Caisson 
Club President 4 

Regina Maginnis - 7725 Rockwell Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Stanley A. Malinowski - 2462 Memphis St., 
Phila., Pa. - B.S. in Marketing — Collegian 3. 
Dennis T. Mallon - 1086 Emerson La., Anda- 
lusia, Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Jay F. Mallon — 2 W. Hampton Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in General Business. 

Brian D. Malloy - 19 Regent Rd., Cherry Hill. 



N.J. — B.A. in Political Science. 

Gerald A Marchini - 7419 Hill Rd., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Finance. 

Peter V. Marks — 541 Benner St.. Phila.. Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Relations - Industrial Rela- 
tions Commission 4. 

John P. Maroccia — 5614 Edwards Ave., Pen- 
nsauken. N.J — B.A in English — Collegian. 
John R. Marple — 505 Marshallton Rd., Down- 
ington. Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Gloria Thersa Marsh - 1023 W. Kings Hwy., Mt. 
Ephraim. N.J. — B.A. in English — Italian Club. 
Thomas J. Marsh — 2904 Passmore St., Phila.. 
Pa. - B.A. in Social Work - Baseball - Sociol- 
ogy Club 

Arthur J. Martin. Jr. — 126 Annapolis Rd., 
Pennsville. N.J — B.A. in Math /Education — La- 
Salle College Band 1. 2, 3. 
James T. Martin. Jr. - 2225 N. Trenton St.. Ar- 
lington, Va. — B.S. in Economics — Academic 
Affairs Comm. 2, 3 — Tau Kappa Epsilon 3 — In- 
terfraternity Council President 3. 
William Masturzo — 606 Vernon Rd.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Finance — Intramurals 3 — Education 
Club 4. 

Joseph Matis — 423 Laurel St., Susquehanna, 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Intramural Basket- 
ball — S.A.M. — Accounting Assn. 
Raymond A. Mattern — 3414 Friendship St.. 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Philosophy — Intramurals 1, 
2. 3. 4 — Class Secretary 1 — Student Govern- 
ment Secretary 2. 

Michael Matthews - 1315 Northup Rd.. Drexel 
Hill, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology. 
Ronald J. Mayberry - 6523 N. 5th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History — Veteran's Club. 
Michael Maylath - 1105 Farmington Ave., Potts- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in History/Education — Veter- 
an's Club 2, 3, 4. 
Stephen Mazur - 4338 Lauriston St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Math. 

Joan W. Mehelich - 2958 Banner Rd.. Willow 
Grove. Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 
Joseph A. Mengacci — 142 May St.. Naugatuck. 
Conn. — B.S. in General Business — Italiano 
Club — Residence Council — Stenton Tutorial 
Program — Intramural Basketball & Football. 
John J. Middleton — 304 Charles Ave., Croydon, 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Band 1, 2. 3, 4 — 
R.O.T.C. Outstanding Freshman Cadet 1. 
Bruce A. Miles — 805 Webster Rd.. Webster. 
NY. — B.S. in Accounting — Phi Sigma Kappa 
2, 3, 4 — Intramurals — Yearbook. 
Douglas P. Miraglia — 3000 Woodhaven Rd., 
Apt. 303 Bldg. 21, Phila., Pa, - B.A. in Criminal 
Justice — Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3. 
Roman Orest Mirchuk — 5012 N. Marvine St.. 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in History — Slavic Club 1, 2 

— Ukrainian Club President 3. 

Stanley G. Mohn, Jr. — 317 Daleview Dr., Mor- 
risville, Pa. — B.S. in Psychology. 
Joseph V. Monaghan — 13044 Richwood Rd.. 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law. 
William M. Monteleone - 1911 Berkshire St., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law — Italian Club — 
R.O.T.C. — Freshman Orientation — Intramural 
Basketball & Football. 

C. P. Mooney — 8002 Rodney St.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Marketing — Intramurals. 
John W. Morello, Jr. — 380 Burnside Ave.. Nor- 
ristown, Pa. — B.S. in Business. 
John F. Moross. Jr. — 8810 Wainwright Rd.. 
Wyndmoor, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — In- 
tramurals. 

John M. Motto — 335 Lafayette Ave., Palmerton, 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Residence Council 
3. 

John D. Moura — 96 Willow St.. Cambridge, 
Mass. — B.A. in Philosophy 
Daniel N. Mullen - 5129 N. 11th St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology. 

William Mullen - 18 Coolidge Ave.. Ortley 
Beach. N.J. — B.A. in History. 
William H. Mullen - 1425 Stover St., Warm- 
inster, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. 3 — Delta Sigma Pi Treasurer 3. President 



Daniel Murnane — 537 Strathmore Rd.. Haver- 
town. Pa. — B.A. in English. 
Jim Murray — 232 W. Fisher Ave.. Phila.. Pa. — 
B.A. in Philosophy 

Thomas E. Murphy - 278 Gramercy Dr., Clifton 
Hgts.. Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Management — 
SAM. 

Timothy P. Murphy — 125 Camden Ave.. Moo- 
restown, N.J. — B.S. in Accounting — Delta Sig- 
ma Pi — Accounting Assn. Treasurer. 
Edwin S. Murray, Jr. — 3719 S. Hereford La.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — In- 
tramurals 1, 2, 3 — Fencing 2 — Orientation 
Comm. 2 — Departmental Board 3 — Academic 
Affairs Comm. 3 — Ring Comm. Chairman 3 — 
President Class of 1972 3. 

Michael J. Murray - 422 N. Sterling Rd., Elkins 
Park, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Orientation 
Comm. 3 — Intramurals 2, 3. 
K. Denise Muth — 164 Roslyn Ave., Glenside, 
Pa. — B.A. in Math /Education. 



N 



George A. Naab, Jr. - 4027 MacNiff Dr., La- 
fayette Hill. Pa. - B.A. in Psychology — Psy- 
chology Assn. Secretary 4. 
Anthony Nardotti - 1306 Reed St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Biology. 

Frederick R. Nedl - 36 Shadywood Rd., Levit- 
town, Pa. — B.S. in Economics — College Union 
Comm. 1 . Secretary 2 & 3, 4. 
Lawrence J. Nedzbala — 40 Thomas PI., Levit- 
town, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Caisson Club. 
Thomas J. Niwinski — 3057 Frankford Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Richard A. Nisula — 21 Woodside La., Cinna- 
minson, N.J. — B.S. in Marketing — Marketing 
Assn. 4. 
Michael D. Nolan - 101 E. Olive, Westville, N.J. 

— B.S. in Marketing — Curriculum Comm. 4 — 
Pi Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, President 4. 

Michael A. Nuccio - 5004 Miriam Rd., Phila., 

Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Anthony D. Nucera - 10 Carey Dr.. Ambler, Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science — Theta Sigma Pi 1, 
2,3. 




John J. O'Connor, Jr. — 6323 Oakley St., Phila.. 

Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Chester J. Oczkowski - 2067 E. Stella St., 

Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — College Union 

Committees — Student Congress. 

James J. O'Donnell - 3226 Cedar St., Phila., 

— B.S. in Math. 

Marie O'Donnell — 291 Nandina PL, Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology. 

Thomas P. O'Donnell — 345 Stevens St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta — 
Phi Alpha Beta — Departmental Board. 
Gerald P. Oeste - 1928 Lardner St., Phila., Pa. 
—B.S. in Finance and Accounting — Finance 
Assn. President 3. 

John J. O'Hara. Jr. - 553 Charles Dr., King of 
Prussia, Pa. — B.A. in Biology — College Union 
Comm. 1. 2. 3, 4 - Alpha Epsilon Delta 2, 3, 
Treasurer 4. 

Robert A. O'Hara - 1436 S. Oak Rd., Feaster- 
ville, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Joseph J. O'Hare. Ill - 1527 Forest Villa La., 
McLean. Va. — B.A. in History. 
Mark C. Olkoski — 2035 E. Moyamensing Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Bas- 
ketball 1 — Industrial Relations Comm. Secre- 
tary. 

Bernard A. O'Neill - 102 Wayne Ave., Colling- 
dale, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. 
Frank O'Neill - 1841 S. 68th St., Phila.. Pa. - 



B.A. in History — Baseball 3, 4 — Departmental 
Board 3. 4 — Historical Society Treasurer 3. 
Joseph A. O'Neill - 3233 Englewood St., Phila.. 
Pa. — B.A in History. 

Joseph J. O'Neill - 4220 L St.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Pre-Law. 

Joseph L. Orlando — 3832 Brunswick Ave., Dre- 
xel Hill. Pa. - B.S. in Industrial Relations. 
James W. Osborne — 32 W, Washington La., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Sociology — Student Rep- 
resentative on the Library Comm. 
Timothy E. Osborne - 902 Lomond La.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History — College Union Comm 1 . 
2, 3, 4 - Chess Club 1,2, 3,4. 
Lawrence J. O'Toole — 1134 Sheridan Ave. 
Pittsburg, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Robert J. Ousey — 2455 Brookdale Ave., Ros- 
lyn, Pa. - B.A. in Math - Ex-G.l. Club 




Francis J. Pace — 1562 Pastorius St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Club 4 — 
History Club 2 — Intramural Football 1. 
Anthony J. Paciello — 116 S. Spring Garden St., 
Ambler, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Departmen- 
tal Board 3 — Freshman Orientation Comm. 4 — 
College Union Comm. 

Paul J. Pantano - 2323 S. 17th St.. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in Mathematics - Math Club 1,2,3,4- 
Departmental Board 2 — Kappa Mu Epsilon 3, 4. 
Peter A. Parrott - 1512 Howell St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Pre-Law. 

Donald P. Pazel — Route 1 — Waymart, Pa. — 
B.A. in Mathematics — Departmental Board 2 — 
Kappa Mu Epsilon Secretary 4 — Intramurals. 
Lewis Pearlman - 10032 Verree Rd., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. — 
Departmental Board — Veteran's Club. 
Michael Pearlman - 9117 Bustleton Ave., 
Phila.. Pa. - B.A. in Biology. 

Gary Pearlstein - 1231 E. Durham St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Biology — lota Alpha Beta. 
Michael J. Pekula - 4449 N. 5th St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in English — Phi Kappa Theta 2, Presi- 
dent 3, 4. 

John M. Penny - 344 S. Chester Pk., Glenol- 
den, Pa. — B.S. in General Business — In- 
tramurals 1, 2. 3, 4 — Basketball 1 — The Colle- 
gian 3. 

John F. Pepe — 29 Leighton Terr.. Upper Darby, 
Pa. — B.A. in History/Education — Recondos — 
Caisson Club — Howitzer Editor. 
Piero L. Perilli - 2628 S. Hicks St.. Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Mathematics. 

Arthur A. Perry - 714 Ripley PL, Phila.. Pa. - 
B.S. in Accounting — Intramurals. 
John H. Perry - 122 E. Park Ave., Merchant- 
ville, N.J. — B.S. in General Business — Veter- 
an's Club. 

Stanley T. Peterson - 108 McCormick St., Rid- 
ley Park, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Richard A. Petrarla - 4444 Vista St.. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in English/Education — English and 
Education Departmental Boards — Veteran's 
Club — Education Society President. 

Gary T. Petrauski - 4230 "I" St.. Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Biology — College Union Comm. — Al- 
pha Epsilon Delta — Phi Alpha Beta. 
Eugene D. Petrelli — 1108 E. Cheltenham Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
George Petrokubi — 17 N. Ridgeway Ave., Gle- 
nolden, Pa. - B.A. in Psychology - Psychology 
Club 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Daniel L. Pfaff - 7026 Harrington Rd., Lexing- 
ton, Michigan — B.A. in English — Dean's List 3. 
John M. Pfeffer. Jr. - 2105 S. 16th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in History/Education — Veteran's 
Club 3, 4. 

Gary Piech — 5659 Loretto Ave.. Phila.. Pa. — 
B.A. in Chemistry — Chyman Society 3, 4 — Stu- 
dent Affairs Comm. 4. 

Thomas J. Pilgermayer - 29 E. Glenside Ave.. 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations. 



77 



Thomas Piskorski — 3154 Derry Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Spanish. 

Charlees P. Pizzi, Jr. - 1151 N. 65th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Marketing Assn. 
Bruce Plentus - 54 Hutton Rd., Clifton. N.J. - 
B.S. in Accounting — Departmental Board 3 — 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 4 — Resi- 
dent Halls Assistant Director 3. 
Michael Plover - 3508 Drumore Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Chemistry. 

Albert Podolsky - 7921 Fayette St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Pre-Law Club Secre- 
tary. 

Anthony F. Poekert — 82 W. Spencer St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Club 3, 
4. 

Joseph F. Pomager — 4479 Salmon St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psychology Club. 
Raymond J. Porreca — 1420 E. Johnson St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Cur- 
riculum Comm. 2 — LaSalle in Europe 3 — Stu- 
dent Government Secretary 1 . 
Eric B. Posnan - 10778 Heather St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting. 

Robert Pote — 2220 Cedar St., Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Mathematics. 

Patrick Powell - 1451 S. 28th St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Industrial Relations. 
Michael E. Preston - Worthington Mill Rd., 
Richboro, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Crew 1 . 
Michael J. Previti, Jr. — 2212 Arctic Ave., Atlan- 
tic City, N.J. — B.S. in Marketing — Tau Kappa 
Epsilon 1 , 2, Treasurer 3. 

Frank Priscaro — 817 Hilltop Dr., Clarks Sum- 
mit, Pa. — B.A. in English — LaSalle in Europe 
3. 
Stephen E. Purol - 127 McKean St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Departmental Board — 
Accounting Assn. — Beta Alpha Vice-President 

— Dean's List. 




Dennis A. Quill — 26 Glenrock Dr., Claymont, 

Del. — B.A. in History. 

Dennis M. Quill - 5410 Oakland St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Industrial Relations. 

Edward V. Quinn - 7281 Valley Ave., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology 

John P. Quinn — 1418 Rosalie St., Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Psychology — Phi Kappa Theta. 
Charles J. Quattrone, Jr. — 2432 Perot St.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Management - Fencing 
Club 1,2— College Union Comm. 1, 2, 3. Chair- 
man 4. 




John A. Rates - 8257 Tabor Rd.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Chemistry. 

Edward P. Rafter - 5541 Chester Ave., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Russian — Men's Chorale 3 — 
Concert Choir 3. 4. 

Anthony Reagoso — 817 Burmont Rd., Drexel 
Hill, Pa. -B.A. in English. 
Joseph P. Reaney — 7336 Pittville Ave., Phila.. 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Stephen J. Redden — 622 Woodlawn Dr., Hav- 
ertown, Pa. — B.A. in English. 
John E. Redfern - 2524 Meredith St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Cross Country 
1,2 — Track 2, 3. 

Joseph F. Register — 12468 Sweet Briar PI. , 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Joseph A. Reh — 1034 66th Ave., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Economics — Band — German Club — 
LaSalle in Europe 3. 

John Michael Repko — 248 Woodbridge Rd., 
Clifton Heights, Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Manage- 
ment. 
Anthony Nicholas Ricci — 114 Bellevue Ave., 



Springfield, Pa. — B.A. in English. 
Robert J. Richardson — 5946 Lawndale St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting 
Assn. 3. 

Albert J. Rieger, Jr. — 5344 Jackson St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics — Departmental 
Board — Intramurals — Kappa Mu Epsilon Vice- 
President 3 and 4. 
James Ritvalsky — 7304 Sackett St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology — College Union Comm. 
1,2. 3,4. 

Dennis W. Robinson — 508 Eighth St., New 
Cumberland, Pa. — B.A. in History — The Mas- 
que Chancellor 2 and 3, President 4 — Alpha 
Psi Omega Vice-President 3, Secretary 4 
Gary E. Robinson - 4020 Kottler Dr., Lafayette 
Hill, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology - Psi Chi 3. 4 — 
Psychology Club Vice-President 3 and 4. 
Herbert C. Robinson — 1573 Township Line 
Rd., Norristown, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
John A. Rodgers - 5826 Oakland St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics — Kappa Mu Epsilon 

— Mathematics Club Treasurer 3. 4 — Varsity 
Soccer Captain 3, 4. 

Thomas J. Rodgers - 3248 Maple Rd., Hunt- 
ington Valley, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics. 
Greg C. Rollins - 7301 Chestnut Ave., Melrose 
Park, Pa. - B.A. in English. 
Wayne M. Romanczyk - 209 E. Wishart St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics — Kappa Mu 
Epsilon Secretary — Mathematics Club — In- 
tramural Football. 

Anthony N. Romantini - 6306 Race St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Charles A. Roop - 201 E. 11th Ave.. Con- 
shohocken, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — St. 
Thomas More Society — Beta Alpha Treasurer 

— Delta Sigma Pi Chancellor. 

Joseph F. Roscioli — 214 Jefferson St., Belmont 
Hills, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics. 
Robert F. Rose — 1661 Stephens Dr., Wayne, 
Pa. - B.A in History, 

Robert B. Rotellini - 316 Central Ave., Runne- 
mede. N.J. — B.S. in Industrial Management — 
S.A.M. 2. 3, 4 - Veteran's Club 1, 2, 3, 4 - In- 
dustrial Relation Comm. 4 — St. Thomas More 
Society 4. 

Michael Thomas Rufo — 517 Larkspur St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Intramurals 1. 
Daniel F. Ruggieri, Jr. — 820 Meeting House 
Rd., Cinnaminson, N.J. — B.A. in His- 
tory/Education. 

Glenn C. Russell — 417 Compass Ave., Beach- 
wood, NJ. — B.S. in General Business — Phi- 
losophy Club. 

Joseph T. Ryan — 219 Cobalt Ridge Dr., Levit- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics — College 
Union Comm. Treasurer, Vice-Chairman — 
Caisson Club. 



4 




Michael J. Saile - 1815 Chandler St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Departmental Board — 
Accounting Assn. — Tau Kappa Epsilon — St. 
Thomas More Society. 

George Anthony Saitta — 5962 Jannette St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 
Chester J. Salwach — 228 Plymouth Ave., Ore- 
land, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics — Kappa Mu 
Epsilon — Mathematics Club. 
Philip P. Samsel - 3011 Tilton St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.S. in Accounting. 

Anthony C. Santopolo — 7931 Temple Rd., 
Phila., Pa. - B.A. in Biology — Phi Alpha Beta 

— Alpha Epsilon Delta. 

Terrence Santovito — 7 Concord Rd., Darby, 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Phi Kappa 
Theta Vice-President. 

Joseph E. Schaeffer - 4818 N 4th St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Janis C. Schamenek — 1647 N. Hills Ave., Wil- 
low Grove, Pa. — B.A. in Psychology. 
John T. Schiavone — 136 Upper Ferry Rd., 

78 



Trenton, N J. — B.A. in History — Departmental 
Board 1, 2. 3. 4 — Historical Society 1, 2, 3, 4 — 
Secretary to the Dept. of History 3, 4. 
Joseph W. Schmidt - 709 Graisbury Ave., Had- 
donfield, N.J. — B.A. in Mathematics/Education. 
Robert Schoenberger — 18 Stuyvesant Oval, 
New York, NY. — B.A. in History — Departmen- 
tal 2, 3 - Historical Society 1,2 — The Colle- 
gian 1 — Track Team 1 , 2, 3, 4. 
Michael Schott — 36 N. Clermont, Margate, N.J. 
B.A. in History — Residence Council. 
Thomas F. Schreiber. Jr. — 6040 Logan Way 
Apt. C-1, Bladensburg, Md. — B.A. in Psy- 
chology — Residence Council. 
Thomas Schurtz - 54 White PI., Clark, N.J. — 
B.A. in English/Education. 
Robert W. Schwaneberg — 448 Manor Rd., 
Hathoro, Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Col- 
lege Union Comm. 1, 2, 3 — The Collegian 
Photo Unit Chief 3. 

John L. Schwartz - 2930 Guilford St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Psi Chi Vice — 
President 3, 4 — Psychology Club 1.2,3, 4. 
James J. Schwegel — 1015 Rosalie St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Intramural Basket- 
ball 2 — Accounting Assn. 3, Vice-President 4 — 
Beta Alpha 3, 4, 

Thomas A. Schweiker — 4104 Cottman Ave., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Sociology — The Collegian. 
Peter J. Seccia - 5205 N. 9th St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Sociology - St. Gabriel's Club. 
Louis J. Sessinger, Jr. — 3455 Street Rd., Hopk- 
11, Cornwell Heights, Pa - B.A. in Eng- 
lish/Education — Veteran's Club Vice-President 
4 

Gregory J. Severn — 741 Berkshire Ave.. Pitts- 
burg, Pa. — B.A. in English/Education — Men's 
Chorale 1, Accompanist 2 — Concert Choir Ac- 
companist 3. 

Mark E. Severns — 301 Roxborough Ave., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 
Robert Shannon - 5626 N. 18th St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Spanish/Education — Men's Chorale 

— International Society Vice-President — Span- 
ish Club. 

William S. Shannon, III - 3526 Wessey Ln., 

Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Semper 

Fidelis Vice-President. 

John P. Shipe — 2263 Hillcrest Ave., Pennsau- 

ken, N.J. — B.S. in Management — Howitzer 

Vice-Editor 3. 

James Siegel — 9969 Verree Rd., Phila., Pa. — 

B.A. in English — Weber Society. 

Joseph F. Sierotowicz — 707 Elkwood Dr., New 

Cumberland, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Delta 

Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4 — Crew Team 1 , 2. 

Thomas Sinclair — 118 Lexington Ave., E. Lan- 

sdowne, Pa. — B.A. in History/Education. 

Thaddeus J. Skarbek - 3565 Miller St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 

Paul Skiendzielewski - 11621 Stevens Rd., 

Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Biology. 

John Skabonja - 848 Almond St., Phila,, Pa. - 

B.A. in History. 

Michael Slanina - 2655 Orthodox St., Phila., 

Pa. — B.A. in Biology. 

Gregory R. Smart — 8757 Crispin St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science/Education. 

Barry Smith — 312 S. Swarthmore Ave., Swarth- 

more, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Kevin P. Smith — 312 S. Swarthhmore Ave., 

Swarthmore, Pa. — B A. in History/Education. 

Thomas M. Smith — Helen Marie Apts., Apt L-6, 

Lansdale, Pa. — B.A. in Pre-Law. 

Jim Smither — 34 Constantine PI., Summit, N.J. 

— B.A. in Psychology. 

Ronald Smolenski - 243 S. 3rd St., Quak- 

ertown, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Intramural 

Football, Basketball, and Softball — Marketing 

Assn. 

John Snyder — 803 Pennsylvania Ave., Prospect 

Park, Pa. — B.S. in Finance. 

Howard Spector — 2105 Tyson Ave., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Biology — Phi Alpha Beta — Alpha Ep- 
silon Delta 

Francis J. Spieker - 5151 N. Fairhill St., Phila.. 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing. 



Lewis P. Spiewak — 8536 Williams Ave.. Phila.. 
Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Relations 
Thomas W. Sprague — 5713 Wister St., Apt. A- 
4. Phila. . Pa. — B.A. in Criminal Justice — 
R.O.T.C. 1, 2. 3. 4 — Caisson Club 3. 4 — Resi- 
dence Council 1. 2, 3. 
Herbert Stahl - 5334 N. Carlisle St.. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in Psychology. 

Gerard Stanley - 808 Larkspur St.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in English/Education — The Collegian 3, 
4 Education Society 3. 4 — Education Depart- 
mental Board 3. 4 

W. Richard Stark - 151 New Hackensack Rd.. 
Poughkeepsie. NY — B.S. in Marketing. 
Norman J. Stayton - 2847 Sellers St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in General Business. 
Leo M. Stenton - 219 Park Dr., Glenolden, Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. — In- 
tramural Football and Basketball — Pi Sigma 
Epsilon Treasurer 3, Vice-President 4. 
Richard F. Stephan - 20 N. 7th St.. Allegany, 
NY. — B.S. in Industrial Relations — Industrial 
Relations Comm. 3, Intramural Basketball and 
Softball 1, 2, 3. 

Thomas G. Stewart — 2666 Winchester Ave.. 
Phila., Pa. - B.A. in Political Sci- 
ence Education — Political Science Assn. — 
Student Congress — The Collegian — Young 
Democrats President — Liberal Club Secretary 

— Ring Comm. 

Nicholas F. Sticco - 4533 Ditman St., Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in Pre-Law — Caisson Club — Recondos 

— Howitzer. 

Otto L. Stollenwerk - 667 Lilly Rd.. Warminster, 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Thomas W. Stone — 8514 Provident St.. Phila., 
Pa. - B.A. in Political Science - Political Sci- 
ence Assn. 3 —Stenton Tutors 1. 2, 3. 
Linda J. Stoneback — 910 Alburger Ave.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English /Education. 
Michae D. Sullivan — 101 W. LaCrosse Ave., 
Lansdowne, Pa. — B.A. in History. 
Miller Sullivan — 18 Meade Rd.. Ambler. Pa. — 
B.A. in Biology — Fabrician Society 1 — Alpha 
Epsilon Delta 3. 4 - Phi Alpha Beta 3, 4. 
Stephan Sullivan — 21 Highland Ave., Emerson, 
N.J. — B.S. in Accounting — College Union 
Comm. — Swimming Team. 
Bob Sundermann — 2301 76th Ave., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Pre-Law. 

Francis P. Sutter — 46 School House Ln., Broo- 
mall. Pa. — B.A. in Biology — Track 1. 2. 3 — 
Phi Alpha Beta 3 — Fabrician Society 1. 
Patricia M. Sweeney — 9732 Susan Rd., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in English/Education — Girl's Bas- 
ketball Captain 3. 
Paul B. Sweeney — 4150 Disston St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Sociology/Education — Swimming 
Team 1. 2, 3, 4 - Water Polo Club 2, 3. 4 - 
President Class of '72 1. 

Julie F. Szumilas — 5170 Pennway St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.A. in Sociology/Social Work — Sociolo- 
gy Club. 




Michael A. Toboga — 184 E. Willow Grove Ave., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Finance — Academic Af- 
fairs Comm. — Finance Assn. Secretary — Delta 
Sigma Pi Secretary, 

William N. Tangradi - 3152 S. 18th St.. Phila.. 
Pa. - B.A. in English. 

Daniel E. Thomas — P.O. Box 5150, Phila.. Pa. 
— B.A. in Mathematics — The Masque — Math- 
ematics Club — Theatre Workshop. 
Frazier L. Thompson, Jr. — 443 W. Ellet St.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Psychology — Track Team. 
Peter A. Thompson — 15 Briarcliffe Rd., Glenol- 



den, Pa. — B.S. in Industrial Management — In- 
dustrial Relations Comm. — S.A.M. 
William A Thorp — 2742 Susquehanna Rd., 
Roslyn, Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Theta Sig- 
ma Pi. 

William Tinney — 802 Connell Ave.. Yeadon, Pa. 
— B.S. in General Business. 
Edward Titterton - 7323 Hill Rd.. Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Political Science — Young Democrats — 
St. Thomas More Society. 

Robert T Toohey — 8726 Cottage St.. Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting. 

Louis J. Toth. Jr. - 6266 N. Lawrence St., 
Phila., Pa. — B.S. in Finance. 
Evan Tow — 50 Fieldstone Rd., Levittown, Pa. — 
B.A. in Biology — Men's Chorale 1 — Presi- 
dent's Guard Drill Team 1, 2 - Phi Alpha Beta 
3,4. 

Francis M. Travaline — 944 Maple Ave., Col- 
lingswood, Pa. — B.A. in Liberal Arts — Stenton 
Tutoring Program. 

Robert J. Tucker — 18 Nancy Dr.. Havertown, 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Crew — Intramurals. 
Anthony J. Tulino — 846 Phillips Rd., Warm- 
inster, Pa. — B.A. in Spanish/Education. 
Vincent L. Tumminello — 531 Brook Rd.. Tow- 
son. Md. — B.S. in Economics — Phi Sigma 
Kappa 1 . 2. Pledgemaster 3, 4. 
Pat Tursi — 221 Collingdale Ave., Collingdale, 
Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Intramurals 1, 
2, 3. 4 - Explorer 4. 

Daniel J. Tusavitz — 460 Leedon St., Jenkin- 
town, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics. 
Joseph Tygh - 3829 N. 9th St., Phila.. Pa. - 
B.A. in Political Science — Football 1. 




Ruth A. Veil - 1232 Allengrove St.. Phila., Pa. 
B.S. in Industrial Relations. 




w 



Henry J. Wajda — 4500 E. Thompson St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Accounting — Delta Sigma Pi. 
Phyllis Wakeley - 2002 S. Larnet St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in French. 

Suzin Waldo - 1919 Benton Ave.. Phila., Pa. — 
B.A. in French/Education — Pi Delta Phi 1, 2, 3. 
Vincent P. Walls — 3704 Bonsall Ave.. Drexel 
Hill, Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Departmental 
Board Co-Chairman — St. Thomas More Society 
Treasurer — Marketing Assn. 
Charles J. Walsh - 8324 Brookside Rd.. Elkins 
Park. Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon 1. 2. 3. 4. 
Michael A. Walsh - 5734 N. 6th St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Industrial Management — Delta Sigma 
Pi — Caisson Club — Intramural Softball and 
Football 2. 3. 

Thomas A. Walsh - 8602 Bridle Rd., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Accounting Assn. 
Thomas P. Walsh — 526 Geneva Ave., Phila.. 
Pa. — B.A. in Political Science — Conservative 
Club — Young Republicans — Political Science 
Assn. — Intramurals. 

Jim Ward — 6307 Kingsessing Ave., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Marketing. 

Thomas H. Ward — 29 Royal Crest Dr., Marl- 
boro. Mass. — B.A. in Political Science — Politi- 
cal Science Assn. 4 — Big Brother Assn. 3. 4 — 
St. Thomas More Society — Intramural Basket- 
ball. 
George W. Warrack - 197 8th St., Belford, N.J. 

— B.A. in History — Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4 — 



Baseball 2. 3. 4. 

Elizabeth M. Washofsky - 715 Napfle Ave . 

Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 

Richard Wayden — 1414 Surrey La.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in German — German Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. 
Robert T. Webb - 7260 Leonard St., Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Marketing — Veteran's Club — Market- 
ing Club. 

Robert T. Welsh - 2521 N. Water St.. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.A. in English. 

Gregory Joseph West - 6312 N. 5th St.. Phila., 
Pa. - B.A. in Pre-Law - R.O.T.C Band. 
John Whalen — 1161 Price St.. Phila.. Pa. — 
B.S. in Marketing — Tau Kappa Epsilon 3. 4. 
Joseph Whalen - 3121 Englewood St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Soccer — Tau Kappa 
Epsilon — Marketing Assn. 
Edward B. White, Jr. - 7214 Dungan Rd.. 
Phila., Pa. — B.A. in Sociology. 
Francis C. White - 715 Mallard Rd.. Feaster- 
ville, Pa. — B.A. in Political Science - The Col- 
legian 1 — Political Science Assn. 3 — Young 
Democrats 1 , 2, Secretary 3. 
James R. White — 5892 Henry Ave.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.S. in Accounting — Baseball. 

Leo A. White - 3209 N. Spangler St.. Phila.. Pa. 

— B.S. in General Business. 

Patrick D. White - 1724 Loney St.. Phila.. Pa. — 

B.A. in Political Science. 

Martin Wiley — 807 Lawnton Terr., Glenolden. 

Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Pi Sigma Epsilon 

Secretary. 

David J. Wilkers — 2221 39th St., Pennsauken. 

N.J. — B.S. in Finance — Departmental Board 

Chairman 4 — Track and Field 1 — Academic 

Affairs Comm. 4 — Business Coordinating 

Comm. 4 — Finance Assn. Vice-President 4. 

Patricia Windsor — 92 Harvest Rd.. Levittown. 

Pa. — B.A. in Spanish. 

William F. Wisely — 106 Woodside Ave., Nar- 

berth, Pa. — B.A. in Mathematics. 

Chris R. Wogan - 1114 Faunce St.. Phila., Pa. 

— B.A. in Political Science — Departmental 
Board — Academic Affairs Comm. 

John J. Wolf - 2220 S. 66th St., Phila., Pa. - 
B.A. in Political Science — Political Science 
Assn. 



Joanne M. Yanak — 917 Wynnewood Rd., 
Phila.. Pa. — B.A. in English/Education — St. 
Gabriel's Club. 

Dennis M. Young — 136 Johnson Ave.. Dumont, 
N.J. — B.S. in Accounting — Beta Alpha Presi- 
dent 4 — Delta Sigma Pi 1. 2, Treasurer 3 — 
Fencing Club President 1, 2, 3 — College Union 
Comm. 1 , 2, 3, 4 — Accounting Assn. 2, 3, 4. 
Harold J. Young — 89 S. Lake Dr., Red Bank, 
N.J - B.S. in Business. 

Robert Young — 2220 Locust Rd.. Marton, N.J. 
— B.A. in Mathematics — Academic Affairs 
Comm. 4 — Departmental Board 4 — Kappa Mu 
Epsilon 4 — Newtonian Society 1. 2. Secretary 
3,4. 



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Richard V. Zeller — 522 Mercer Rd., Merion 
Station, Pa. — B.A. in English — Phi Sigma Epsi- 
lon 3, President 4 - The Collegian 1 . 2. 3. 4. 
Henry Zentner — 1927 Kentwood St.. Phila.. Pa. 
— B.S. in Accounting — German Club 1. 
Walter J. Zodeiko - 3224 Stanwood St., Phila., 
Pa. — B.S. in Marketing — Ski Comm. 2. 



79 




dear god; 

an awfulotta people built this 

an' some of um are gonna wonder 

why at the last minute 

i'm punkin' out on the litany— 

on the alphabet soup 

we did it— 

the whole damn bunch of us, 

our way 

our time 

we laughed 
sometimes 
we got pissed 

we got finished 

and that is recognition 

r.e.h. 



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Many thanks to Davor 
Studios, the Sports 
Information Bureau of 
LaSalle and the 
Photography Staffs of 
the Collegian and 
Explorer for their many 
contributions to the 
yearbook. 

EDITORS: Paul Allocca 
Chris O'Neill 




24 









-"•Utti 






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Tucked behind the brick facades on Olney Avenue 

is a pleasantly green and peaceful tract of about 

forty acres. Though buses stop at the door and the 

subway is only a few blocks away, the LaSalle 

campus benefits from some of the country-like 

aspects of its site. Across 20th Street is 



historic Belfield, one of the few farms within the city 
limits. South of the campus lies Wister Woods, now a 
part of Fairmount Park. The result of these happy 
accidents of locale is that the campus retains a 
somewhat suburban atmosphere while losing none of 
the advantages of being an urban college . . . 



. . . Nearby Germantown is the site of beautiful old 
homes and memorable locations dating back to revo- 
lutionary times. 

—LaSalle College Bulletin 





COMrLeTeLY 



©> 






LASALLE GIRL 



by Kalhryn A Frame 



How does one begin a piece on a girl's life at 
LaSalle? And especially for a publication directed at 
more than five times as many men as women? Quite 
a few of the agonies of my life at my Alma Mater are 
so purely peculiar to being a female that the average 
male finds it impossible to understand, much less 
emphathize. 

For instance, how many LaSalle men do you know 
who fight over who's going to clean the bathroom 
next week? And how many do you know who have 
felt that clutch of fear when faced for the first time 
with that assembly line contraceptive dispensary- 
Planned Parenthood? None, that's how many. 

Which is why it is so very difficult to convey even 
the slightest notion of the "LaSalle girl's experience" 
to you guys. For there is no one LaSalle girl and 
there is no one LaSalle girl's existence. And the 
reasons for that all have to do with the myriad of 
roles we will be asked to play during our four years 
here. Which explains why I want to make love when 
you want a mother and why you want dinner when I 
want to discuss Hobbes. 




Kathryn A. Frame is a pseudonym for a LaSalle sophomore girl. 

5 



This is not to say that the LaSalle men and 
women are separated by the differences in their 
respective sexualities; of course, it is precisely 
these differences which bring the two together and 
which brought women to LaSalle in the first place. 
Officially their appearance at LaSalle would 
provide a change— one that could raise the 
school's academic standards. Indeed, the fact of 
women on campus did offer a change which was 
noted, duly if not always appreciatively, by the 
LaSalle male population from janitors and 
administrators to security guards, students, and 
teachers. 

"I've noted some changes— aesthetically, 

for example . . . 

the campus looks a lot prettier now." 

Joseph Bernier 




And of course, educationally LaSalle can be 
considered more of a thrill with girls in the classroom, 
if you can retain the equanimity to suffer through 
general education courses treated as jokes (e.g., the 
science and language requirements, art humanities, 
music humanities, theologies) and take courses 
which interest and motivate you. LaSalle has a lot of 
first-rate teachers, men and women dedicated to their 
students. On the whole, after two years of getting 
acquainted with and integrated into LaSalle college 
life, the girls in class now feels 'stared at' no more 
than would be expected anywhere within a 
population that's about 85% male. 

Being such a minority and being the newest 
members of the LaSalle community led the LaSalle 
women to suspect that they were the butts of a 
campus-wide initiation joke, when they ventured into 
the first stages of student activities. Alas, it was 
realized soon enough that the administrative hassles 
which arose were no laughing matter, nor were they 
some sort of endurance test for, or discrimination 
against, LaSalle's weaker sex. For, whether male or 
female, the sad fact of the matter is that attempting 
to run a student activity means the ultimate in red- 
tape indignities. In exchange for the opportunity to 
expend one's time, free of charge, for the supposed 
benefit of one's fellow students, the activities office 
demands a budget request, a subvention request, 
requests for space allocation, telephones, typewriters 
and— inevitably— paper. One also gets to play with 
inter-departmental memos, schedules, calendars, 
invoices, deposit slips, etc. And every student activity 
must find someone to crank out similar forms. 

You name it, 305 can get it (with triplicate 
requisitions and four weeks time)— and getting it out 
of them is almost as painless as a wisdom tooth 
extraction. But if you have it and the Student 
Activities Office wants it— watch out! They have 
powers that reach even to the Holy of Holies 
(Holeys?), the Bursar's Office. If you owe some 
money for an overdue library pamphlet, don't plan to 
graduate until it's paid. 

Of course in my two years at LaSalle I've come up 
against some problems— administrative, social, 
personal— which would be pertinent only to a woman. 
Trying to find work through LaSalle's placement 
office, for example: the wide variety of job 
advertisements and applications which this office 
provides are of little help to a LaSalle girl unless she 
enjoys stocking shelves, putting bicycles together, 
and loading trucks. The problems like this, however, 
are countered by benefits such as the Financial Aid 
Department's work-study operation, which integrated 
girls into its program on campus immediately. 

In short, there are problems that accompany a girl 
entering LaSalle College— perhaps more than at some 
schools. But LaSalle women apparently can handle 
them— I'd say that the majority of us draw strength 
from some inner source of tolerant fortitude. Or 
something. 

"Tout va a qui sait attendre." (Everything 
comes to those who wait.) 

French proverb 




1971-72 Social Queen, Barbara Ann Ferrino 






11 







HAVE YOU HAD 

YOUR PILL TODAY 



12 




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KEEP YOUR 
VALUABLES 
LOCKED UP 
AT ALL TIMES 




14 




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15 



The day was a year at first 
When children ran in the garden; 
The day shrank down to a month 
When the boys played ball. 




THIS WEEK IN THE UNION 




STUDENT PAINTERS 




Our education has got to be revolutionized. Our 
brain must be educated through the hand. If I were 
a poet, I would write poetry of the possibilities of 
the five fingers. Why should you think that the 
mind is everything and the hands and feet noth- 
ing? Those who do not train their hands, who go 
through the ordinary rut of education, lack 'music' 
in their life. All their faculties are not trained. Mere 
book knowledge does not interest the child so as 
to hold his attention fully. The brain gets weary of 
mere words, and the child's mind begins to wan- 
der. The hand does the things it ought not to do; 
the eye sees the things it ought not to see; the ear 
hears the things it ought not to hear; and they do 
not do, see, or hear, respectively, what they ought 
to. They are not taught to make the right choice, 
and so their education often proves their ruin. An 
education which does not teach us to discriminate 
between good and bad, to assimilate the one and 
eschew the other, is a misnomer. 

—Mohandas Gandhi 



bfi „ oil L 

lil /Skip 








19 




"Men and women are equal but not identical. It 
upsets me that someone would rather I don't consider 
her a woman, for I know I like to be thought of as a 
man." But Mr. Bernier, they object to being 
discriminated against, by being considered first as a 
woman . . . "Of course, above all else everyone should 
be considered as a person, and then as a man or 
woman. I sympathize completely with the main goals of 
the movement— equal job opportunities, equality in 
salary and prestige. I think women should have the 
same opportunities as a man in work or in any other 
endeavor, but it's unfortunate for women's liberation 
movements that so much emphasis has been placed 
upon picayune issues. For example, what a woman 
wants to be called: certainly her title may be symbolic of 
how she will be treated . . . but on the whole, this sort of 
thing distracts one from the main movement." They feel 
that certain members of the Counseling Center are 
opposed to the Women's Rights Movement on campus. 
"Well, I can't speak for each person on the staff, but 
the Center as a whole has concentrated on providing 
for LaSalle's girls' counseling. We do in fact have a 
woman counselor on the staff; Wilma Cohen was hired 



for part-time counseling last September. We have not 
been able to increase the staff since then because of 
budgetary considerations, but the Counseling Center's 
facilities are quite adequate for both women and men." 

Do you think, though, that the girls are hesitant to 
come to you as a man, Mr. Bernier, with problems about 
their sexuality? "Well, you have to remember first of all 
that not all counseling is done in the Center; a girl with 
an immediate problem such as pregnancy may be more 
inclined to talk to Dean Montgomery, B. Anne Hageman, 
or the nurse, Regina Gordon, than to a male counselor. 
Mainly, we get more couples who are seeking help for 
less immediate problems with their sexuality, such as, 
with the morality of certain things." 

Does the college give you any specific moral 
viewpoints which you should present to a student who 
would come for such counseling on sexual problems? 

"First of all, we don't tell a student anything. We 
discuss with them their feelings and their alternatives 
regarding problems, and the student ultimately makes 
his own decision. 

The college does not control us at all. It accepts us 
as professionals doing a professional job." 



20 



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• FOR SA LE 

ENGAGEMENT RING & WEDDING BAND 

(Registered Diamond) 

Reasonable 
lxt. 259 



I 




The recent trouble which arose over the Collegian's 
advertisement of an abortion referral service brought to 
light several problems which the Counseling Center, 
despite its facilities, was unprepared to handle alone. 
These are certain intimate aspects of a student's 
sexuality which concern his total involvement at the 
college; consequently, some program was needed 
which would combine all of the college's resources to 
help the student. 

Dr. Thomas McCarthy, Vice-President of Student 
Affairs, sensed this need and organized counselors, 
teachers, and administrators for an investigation of the 
problem. Out of the meeting came a new committee, the 
Sex Committee, designed to provide new services for 
the student on campus who finds himself bewildered by 
homosexuality, an unwanted pregnancy, or maybe just 
difficulty in relating to the opposite sex. 

"We are concerned now with a variety of things in the 
area of human sexuality. We are planning to institute a 
course offering through the Special Topics Course in 
Psychology. We are planning to serve as a co- 
ordinating group for various programs to be offered on 
human sexuality on campus, and we are planning to set 
up a training program for volunteers so that peer 
counseling will be available in all areas of human 
sexuality, including contraception, pregnancy, abortion, 
homosexuality, and the like." 

J. Bernier, counselor 




I recreate in a friend my 
own 

world— or take to me his 
new 

one— and we two look at 
one 

mirror from different sides. 
— Friedrich Emerson 





Friendships last when each friend thinks he has a 
slight superiority over the other. 

—Balzac 



Funny, you don't look like a friend— ah, but they 
never do. 

—Grace Metalious 



There is magic in the memory 
of a schoolboy friendship; 
it softens the heart, and 
even affects the nervous sys- 
tem of those who have no 
hearts. 

—Benjamin Disraeli 




22 




hie esT tx,\^Aȣ 
H IHC 9JSPC lUVpa^L 




sorderly conduct 
^'nsfihRmy — 







e up as 
MatenMo death by a 
rely offense was this 



I saicLGod lied to Adam, i- 

and destined him to lead a life of a fool, 
( 1 \ 




^* j ignorant that there iaevil in the world as well as good.r^** V 

* yz$. When Adam; outwitted Ged by eatirik the apple, £» 

^ afodLsaJv 



s 



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God drove hir 



ForCr 




from taking 



fruit of 



t's sake, you sensible, people; 

V? full 
Here's what God Wijnself said. t abput ityitvtfi 

—"And tite ;Lord God said, behold the man 



book of Genesis 



is becorcje fcne of us'\ (alitile ertvy, you see) 



'to know gotfi'and evil" (the zffin&fyd !i e exposed) 



an^ 

ar 



hand 
life, 
i\awc£r\e forfver: 

God sefit him forth 




Th e ref o'r^ t hclLc ya 

frorrlthe Gai Jen of Idefi." 

(The reason I bllieve G )d cruf ifieq His own Son 

to~ get butV the vretclpd tajngle is, 



becak. 



ds jupt likejHim.) 



23 




24 



pat 300ne have gun will travel double bubble to kill a mockingbird 
j.d. salinger prank gtfford gregory peck the supremes sandy koufax 
panavtsion marvin gaye eddie fisher pop art jules feiffer maxwell 
taylor robert mcnamara la guardia bennet cerf the buffalo spring- 
field sam rayburn u.n.i.c.e.f. the r0sf.nberg3 mimi fisemhower 
alger hiss ben-gurion allen dulles try white cap perry como the 
world's fair adiai stevenson huntley-brinkley cape canavril oscar 
meyer hot dogs cary grant mayor joseph clark mccall's magazine 
tyrone power liberty magazine the beach boys raggedy ann dolls 
i saw mommy kissing santa ci.aus bachelor father mario savio sea 
hunt nary wells jr. walker amd the all stars under the boardwalk 
casey stengel ozzie and harriet kirk douglas the studebaker steve 
McQueen the adventures of superman eddie sawyer rin tin tin sophia 
loren ia33ie polaroid cameras floyd patterson r0dger3 and ham- 
merstein nick 3korich the bay of pigs tito dennis the menace 
the $6^,000 question the lark the u.a.r. andrei groriyko dag ham- 
marskjold n.a.t.'o. wladziu v. liberace h.l. hunt j. edgar hoover 
andrew wyeth poppa doc the chinese bandits beatniks wagon train 
earl warren clark garte the restless gun the nautilus dr. salk 
boris pasternak pete dawkins of arm' the life of riley pat brown 
nelson a. rockefeller hurrtcanf. hazel the old madison square garden 
roy harris lester b. pearson james reston drew pearson harold e. 
stas3en princess grace explorer i billy graham audte murphy van 
cliburn henry wallace sputnik the hungarian revolt king faisal ii 
herb elliot bernard goldfine picasso sherman adams orval e. 
faubu3 salvador dali batista anthony perkins truth or consequences 
the bridge over the river kwai yul brynner -louis b. mayer funny 



FACE BY LOVE POSSESSED BOBBY LAYNE PHIL SILVERS GOMULKA NEHRU 
FRED ALLEN ESTES KEFAUVER AVRILL HARRIMAN MEET THE PRESS PLAYHOUSE 90 



Once upon a time there was a man who sought escape from the prattle of his 
neighbors and went to live alone in a hut he had found in the forest. At first he 
was content, but a bitter winter led him to cut down the trees around his hut for 
firewood. The next summer he was hot and uncomfortable because his hut had 
no shade, and he complained bitterly of the harshness of the elements. 

He made a little garden and kept some chickens, but rabbits were attracted by 
the food in the garden and ate much of it. The man went into the forest and 
trapped a fox, which he tamed and taught to catch rabbits. But the fox ate up the 
man's chickens as well. The man shot the fox and cursed the perfidy of the 
creatures of the wild. 

The man always threw his refuse on the floor of his hut and soon it swarmed 
with vermin. He then built an ingenious system of hooks and pulleys so that 
everything in the hut could be suspended from the ceiling. But the strain was too 
much for the flimsy hut and it soon collapsed. The man grumbled about the 
inferior construction of the hut and built himself a new one. 

One day he boasted to a relative in his old village about the peaceful beauty 
and plentiful game surrounding his forest home. The relative was impressed and 
reported back to his neighbors, who began to use the area for picnics and 
hunting excursions. The man was upset by this and cursed the intrusiveness of 
mankind. He began posting signs, setting traps, and shooting at those who came 
near his dwelling. In revenge groups of boys would come at night from time to 
time to frighten him and steal things. The man took to sleeping every night in a 
chair by the window with a loaded shotgun across his knees. One night he turned 
in his sleep and shot off his foot. The villagers were chastened and saddened by 
this misfortune and thereafter stayed away from his part of the forest. The man 
became lonely and cursed the unfriendliness and indifference of his former 
neighbors. And in all this the man saw no agency except what lay outside himself, 
for which reason, and because of his ingenuity, the villagers called him the 
American. 

from The Pursuit of Loneliness 




"Your teachers at La Salle are Christian Brothers, priests, 
and lay professors. All of them share the same goal: to be as 
much help to you, the student, as they can be. St. La Salle's 
dedication to teaching is the informing spirit of the College, and 
you will be conscious of this spirit in the willingness of your 
professors to give that extra moment of explanation or advice 
which can mean so much. While many of these men are en- 
gaged in their own scholarship or research, their primary focus 
is always the classroom and their basic obligation is to you, the 
student." 

-La Salle College Bulletin, 1971-1972- 
Now, as a student of La Salle College I know that much of 
what you have just read is simply not true. Of course it would 
be nice and tidy here if it were all true-but being a young, sup- 
posedly aware and enlightened product of superior education, I 
know that we are still in search of absolute truth to begin with. 
Therefore, I must surely not allow my naivete to lead me to be- 
lieve that what is in our college bulletin is, in fact, absolutely 
true. Indeed, I feel the need to actually remind myself of all the 
past experiences in which a professor at La Salle has proven to 
me to be genuinely willing to give "that extra moment of ex- 
planation or advice which can mean so much." Unfortunately, I 
seem to be conscious of very few such experiences after nearly 
four years of exposure in the "arena." Yet, honesty must pre- 
vail—oh, absolute honesty, of course. Am I a freak of the La 
Salle College Community? Am I "short-changed" voluntarily? Or 
am I simply one amongst many? We are all unique organisms 
which must experience and change according to our personal 
motivations. We must, as students, experience from our teach- 
ers what we feel we must; the faculty must do the same. To say 
that a "willingness" exists always, is pure folly. Who can say 
that when a student confronts a professor there always exists a 
reciprocated genuine willingness? I cannot say this. For often 
we dupe ourselves— perhaps, even more often, we dupe others. 
I have confronted faculty members with empty thoughts and 
closed feelings— I have "seeked knowledge" only so far as to 
extend my ego by hearing myself speak. And I sense times 
when those of the "learned class" have spoken off my words 
and my ideas with much the same emptiness. So too, have I ex- 
perienced the times when both the professor and myself have 
uttered the very embodiment of all that is hollow and mean- 
ingless. I feel drained and bewildered after such times; I often 
wish that I could deny myself an "unlived" experience. 

Yet, I remain in tact— indeed enlightened after such unmoving 
experiences, because to compensate for a loss, I seek a gain. I 
seek out a growing experience; I yearn for change. Fortunately 
for my sanity it is very possible to confront those people who 
are genuine, who are willing— and who deny almost noth- 
ing—except those foolish tedious collegiate mind games. La 
Salle does employ many such people— more than most in- 
stitutions of higher education. Dr. Minna Weinstein is one of 
those special "employees." 

I cannot convince myself that Dr. Weinstein would ever be- 
lieve in the absolute truth and totality of the opening statement 
from our college bulletin— afterall, there is no mention of wom- 
en! We do have female professors— fortunately! There is no 
mention of women whose ". . . primary focus is always the 
classroom" and whose ". . . basic obligation is to you, the stu- 
dent." There is no mention of Dr. Weinstein. She is the living 
proof of any truth which can be found in these remarks; she is 
the wise, willing, and worthy scholar of La Salle. Dr. Weinstein's 
classroom experiences are alive, dynamic, spontaneously en- 
thusiastic, for the "good Doctor" possesses a spirit which 
makes these mere adjectives live! And I can live with the knowl- 
edge that here at last, amongst us all, is a valuable source of 
genuine dedication, concern, and willingness. 

6 






i cftikftLE 





I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that it one ad- 
vances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and 

endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will 
meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He 
will put some things behind, will pass an invisible 
boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will be- 
gin to establish themselves around and within him; or 
the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor 

in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license 
of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he sim- 
plifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less 
complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty 

poverty, nor weakness weakness. If you have built cas- 
tles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is, where 
they should be. Now put the foundations under them. 

Henry David Thoreau, Walden 

Dr. Michael Dillon has been awarded the highest recog- 
nition by the Explorer staff on recognition for his teaching 
at LaSalle. 




11 




TEACHER.— I. Nouns, teacher, educator, instructor, 
preceptor, master, tutor, coach, schoolmaster, 
school-mistress, schoolma'am, schoolmarm, peda- 
gogue (often derogatory), dominie, don, Privatdocent 
or docent, professor, lecturer, pupil teacher, practice 
teacher, governess, abecedary, pundit (often deroga- 
tory), music teacher, maestro, trainer, disciplinarian, 
teachers, faculty, staff, professorate, tutoriate. 
guide, counselor, adviser, mentor; pastor, preacher, 
apostle, missionary, catechist; example, pattern, mod- 
el. 



Pressures from students rather than on students 
would seem to be a more apposite concern these days. 
Certain it is that as compared to the frenzy of the 
immediate post-Sputnik era, academic pressures on 
students have been slightly reduced in the last few 
years. Traditional liberal education and undergraduate 
education are undergoing a revivification. Faculty 
members and members of the administration have 
become more humane in the last few years, that is, 
more interested in the needs and development of 
individuals and less concerned with certain abstract 
academic and administrative ends. And yet students 
seem to be more dissatisfied than ever. To some extent 
this may be explained by the feelings of students that 
things are not happening fast enough. They want 
"democracy now." But this is not the whole explanation 
by any means. As I see things, students are responding 
to three strong societal and cultural 
pressures— evolutionary pressures, if you will. They are 
preparing for a future in which there will be a different 
human condition. Students sense these pressures, but 
only vaguely. Their response to these pressures is 
inchoate, if not unconscious. But their response is 
powerful, and much student behavior may be viewed as 
attempts to bend colleges and universities to their will in 
accord with these pressures. 

I quote from J. Bronowski's, The Common Sense of 
Science, on this point: "The key to the action of living 
things then is this, that it is directed toward the future. 
They have a way of knowing what is going to happen 
next. Most of this knowledge is unconscious. We need 
not be astonsihed about this foresight, or at any rate we 
need not find it more astonishing than we find the rest 
of the world. For plainly it has always been the 
condition for the survival of living things, individually 
and in species. Unless they could adapt themselves to 
the future, and interpret its signals in advance, they 
were bound to perish. As I have written elsewhere, "We 
may by studying college students see the future writ 
large." Faculty members and administrators are, of 
course, responding to these evolutionary pressures as 
well; but being older, the forces of conservatism within 
them are stronger. Youth is more responsive to these 
pressures. 

These three pressures are (1) the restoration of viable 
communities in colleges and in society at large, (2) the 
introduction of wholeness or unity into the intellect and 
the personality, (3) the emergence of the ethic of social 
service as a force or motive of great power in modern 
life. 

— Mervin B. Freedman 

from Social Foundations of Education 



12 





Today, education is perhaps the most impor- 
tant function of state and local governments. 
Compulsory school attendance laws and the 

great expenditures for education both dem- 
onstrate our recognition of the importance of 

education to our democratic society. It is the 
very foundation of good citizenship. Today it 
is a principal instrument in awakening the 
child to cultural values, in preparing him for 
later professional training, and in helping him 
to adjust normally to his environment. In 
these days, it is doubtful that any child may 
reasonably be expected to succeed in life if 

he is denied the opportunity of an education. 
Such an opportunity, where the state has un- 
dertaken to provide it, is a right which must 
be made available to all on equal terms. 

We come then to the question presented: 
Does segregation of children in public 
schools solely on the basis of race, even 
though the physical facilities and other "tan- 
gible" factors may be equal, deprive the chil- 
dren of the minority group of equal educa- 
tional opportunities? We believe that it does. 
We conclude that in the field of public educa- 
tion the doctrine of "separate but equal" has 
no place. Separate educational facilities are 

inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that 
the plaintiffs and other similarly situated for 
whom the actions have been brought are by 
reason of the segregation complained of, 

deprived of the equal protection of the laws 
guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. 

This disposition makes unnecessary any dis- 
cussion whether such segregation also viol- 
ates the Due Process Clause of the 
Fourteenth Amendment . . . 

—Chief Justice Earl Warren 

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954 




What can you tell about these pictures? 




c£S 




For of good actions, and of evil actions, and of inaction, there should be knowledge; 
the nature of action is difficult to comprehend. He who in action comprehends in- 
action, and in inaction comprehends action, is a man of wisdom; he whose motions 
are devoid of desire, whose actions are burned clean by the fire of knowledge, is 

learned. 

from the Bhagavad-Gita 





I V /' \<P 



Can you make up a story 
for each picture? 



14 




What is a star, really? Why, frozen magic, of course! 



15 





It is not an easy task to honor a man through ink; it is 
an especially difficult task when "the man" is Dr. Rich- 
ard Lautz. Are words like: "unique," "Imaginative," 
"creative," and "charming," enough to produce a per- 
manent image? Will words ever replace the lived ex- 
perience? Will an unending list of noble adjectives suf- 
fice when there is (for many of us) the opportunity to 
partake in an amazing educational experience? We 
thank Dr. Lautz for his continued excellence at La Salle 
College; we thank the dedicated professor— we thank 
the beautiful man! 
The text below is excerpted from a questionnaire sent 
to Dr. Lautz by the Explorer staff: 
QUESTION: DO YOU LIKE PUZZLES? PLEASE EX- 
PLAIN WHY OR WHY NOT, AND WHAT SORT OF PUZ- 
ZLES DO YOU PREFER. 

ANSWER: Mechanical puzzles bore me stiff. My favorite 
conundrums are the opaque metaphors in contempo- 
rary verse. 
QUESTION: HOW ARE YOU ASSURED OF YOUR OWN 
CREATIVITY AND IMAGINATION? 
ANSWER: I keep active socially; I read a lot, travel a 
great deal— and I take my students seriously. 
QUESTION: DOES ALL THE BUSINESS WITH STUDENT 

PROTEST EVER CAUSE YOU TO ALTER YOUR SENSE 
OF IDENTITY IN ANY SPECIAL WAY? 

ANSWER: I am often envious of the freedom with which 
the college generation is able to express itself. Although 
the proverbial conformity exists to a large extent even 
today, my generation was not willing to create unique 
and individual life styles. Our white bucks were laced up 
very tightly. 

QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU THINK THE STUDENT 
POPULATION OF THIS SCHOOL IS REALLY CON- 
CERNED WITH? 
ANSWER: Making some sense out of life. 

QUESTION: WHAT EXCITES A STUDENT MOST? 
ANSWER: Being personally recognized in any way at 
all. 

QUESTION: WHY IS THE MONA LISA SMILING LIKE 
THAT? 
ANSWER: She's been eating Florentine ice cream. 

QUESTION: WHAT BEST DETERMINES THE MOOD OR 
ATMOSPHERE OF THE CLASSROOM? 

ANSWER: The teacher's preparation— and I don't mean 
a sheaf of notes. Time of day, incidentally, has little to 

do with it. 
QUESTION: IN SOLITUDE, DO YOUR THOUGHTS CON- 
CENTRATE ON ONE PARTICULAR CONCERN OR ARE 
THEY QUICKLY PASSING IN AND OUT OF YOUR CON- 
SCIOUSNESS? 
ANSWER: I contemplate infinity. 

QUESTION: IN A FIVE WORD SENTENCE, WHAT IS 
YOUR GRANDEST HOPE OR IDEAL? 

ANSWER: I can do it in four: Teach something unforget- 
table everyday. 




L- 1 I' 




The education I propose is all that is proper for a 
man, and is one in which all men who are born 
into this world should share . . . Our first wish is 
that all men should be educated fully to full 
humanity; not only one individual, nor a few, nor 
even many, but all men together and single, young 
and old, rich and poor, or high and lowly birth, 
men and women— in a word, all whose fate it is to 
be born human beings; so that at last the whole of 
the human race may become educated, men of all 
ages, all conditions, both sexes and nations. Our 
second wish is that every man should be wholly 
educated, rightly formed not only in one single 
matter or in a few or even many, but in all things 
which perfect human nature. 

—John Amos Comenius 



I half walked, half ran from the house and the 
town, toward the mountains. The fine rain slanted 
into my face, low clouds swept by as though 
weighed down by fear. Near the ground there was 
hardly a breath of air but in the higher altitudes a 
storm seemed to rage. Several times the lurid sun 
broke briefly through harsh rifts in the steel-grey 
clouds. 

Then a loose, yellow cloud swept across the sky, 
collided with the other, grey bank of cloud. In a 
few seconds the wind had fashioned a shape out of 
this yellow and blue-grey mass, a gigantic bird that 
tore itself free of the steel-blue chaos and flew off 
into the sky with a great beating of wings. Then 
the storm became audible and rain rattled down 
mixed with hail. A brief, incredible, terrifying, roar 
of thunder cracked acrossed the rain-lashed 
landscape and immediately afterwards a gleam of 
sunlight burst through. On the nearby mountains 
the pale snow shone livid and unreal above the 
brown forest. 

-HERMANN HESSE 




?t THE STMTE6Y OF PEACE Wm F. Kennedy 



W\LDEN TWO I r 




IMIHtMlMl 



mlmmmmmimlmimimieissiiai 




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19 



COURSE EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE 

Department and Course No. Expected Grade 

Lecturer Your Major 

Check one: Required Elective Your Class 



This semester, all faculty have been encouraged to administer this survey during 
the last week of classes. Responses offered here will not identify any student 
individually. The instructor will receive a summary of class responses and com- 
ments only after final grades have been submitted. At that time, the instructor 
may secure from his Chairman the survey results, which he may utilize for improve- 
ment of teaching and, should he so choose, for reference information. 

1. Were the class presentations effective in meeting course objectives? 

4. always effective 2. sometimes effective 

3. usually effective 1. rarely effective 

2. Does the Instructor show enthusiasm for the subject? 

4. very enthusiastic 2. somewhat enthusiastic 

3. enthusiastic 1. not enthusiastic 

3. Is he or she accessible to students? 

4. very accessible 2. somewhat accessible 

3. accessible 1. not accessible 

4. Does the instructor promote class discussion? 

4. promotes 2. discourages 

3. accepts 1. not applicable 

5. Is his or her presentation clear and understandable? 

4. always 2. sometimes 

3. usually 1. rarely 

6. Is the instructor receptive to disagreement? 

4. highly 2. sometimes 

3. usually 1. never 

7. How would you rate the instructor's fairness in grading? 

4. very fair 2. average 

3. fair 1. unfair 

8. Does the instructor respect the individual student's personality? 

4. always 2. sometimes 
3. usually 1. rarely 



9. Were the contributions of the instructor an integral part of the 
course? 

4. always 2. sometimes 

3. usually 1. rarely 

10. Were the readings relevant to the course? 

4. very 2. somewhat 

3. moderately 1. not relevant 

0. not applicable 

11. Were you expected to think critically and/or creatively in 
this course? 

4. always 2. sometimes 
3. often 1. rarely 

PLEASE TURN OVER. 



20 



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KANT: To be is to do; SARTRE: To do is to be; SINATRA: do be do be do 

21 






WE THE MEMBERS OF THE EDUCATED CLASS. DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO YOU. THE EDUCATOR. 



22 







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23 



YORK TITANS TOMMY MacDONALD WATTS JOHN F. KENNEDY MARILYN MONROE 
THE EDSEL HOPALONG CASSIDY POPE JOHN XXIII PANCHO PINKY LEE WHAT'S 
MY LINE BUD COLLIER DAVE GARROWAY JOHN DALY THIS IS YOUR LIFE ELVIS 
EDWARD R. MURROW TODAY STEVE ALLEN THE KOREAN POLICE ACTION HENRY 
CABOT LODGE FRANK BLAIR MERRY MELODIES WALT DISNEY WALLY COX I LOVE 
LUCY UNCLE PETE BOYLE THE THREE STOOGES MARTIN LUTHER KING SALLY 
STARR TERRY TUNES FURY MICKEY MOUSE WRIGLEY'S CHEWING GUM MATT 
DILLON BEAT THE CLOCK WALTER CRONKITE JOHN WAYNE BERT PARKES THE 
METS JIM BHOWN THE BEATLES ANDY WARHOL JOHN GLENN IKE ALLEN GINS- 
BERG B03 DYLAN ELANOR ROOSEVELT JOAN BAEZ NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV GARY 
POWERS FALLOUT SHELTERS CUBA ERNIE KOVAC THE BERLIN WALL PLUTO 
OLE YELLER PACKY THE U-2 FREEDOM RIDERS DONALD DUCK GOLDFINGER 
HUDI GERNREICH PHILADELPHIA MISSISSIPPI TWIGGY THE DOMINICAN 
REPUBLIC PABLO CASALS AIR FORCE ONE LEE OSWALD NANCY FLEMING LIZ 
TAYLOR HOLDEN CAUFIELD JAMES MEREDITH SNOW WHITE JACK RUBY MALCOLM X 
MIGHTY MOUSE DEBORAH BRYANT JOSEPH MCCARTHY LEONARD "BERNSTEIN THE 
OLD RICHARD NIXON COLE PORTER GONE WITH THE WIND LYNDON B. JOHNSON 
ETHEL MERMAN KIM NOVAK BEN CASEY CALL FOR PHILIP MORRIS FRANK 
SINATRA WHITE BUCKSKIN SHOES THE PURPLE PEOPLE EATER BYE BYE BIRDIE 
AS THE WORLD TURNS BARBARA STREISAND GIGI THE CHIPMUNKS THE AD- 
VENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD LERNER AND LOEWE MARY POPPINS QUEEN ELIZABETH 
RICHARD BURTON NATALIE WOOD WEST SIDE STORY JULIE ANDREWS I WANT 
TO HOLD YOUR HAND ED SULLIVAN MY FAIR LADY CHARLES DEGAULLE THE 
SOUND OF MUSIC NASSAR PAUL NEWMAN GUY L0M3ARD0 JACK PARR HARRY 
BELAFONTE THE COWSILLS DUTCH MASTERS CIGARS DALLAS GREEN THE SATURDAY 
EVENING POST OMNIBUS THE MUSTANG READERS DIGEST NABISCO THE LONE 
RANGER AND TONTO GUYS AND DOLLS GEORGE GOBEL ALFRED HITCHCOCK THE 



OLD MAN AND THE SEA JIMMY STEWART HIGH NOON TWILIGHT ZONE Y.A. TITEL 



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{prologue 




Gbere came at nightfall to tbat bosteln? 
TKIlcll nine ano twenty tn a company 
©t sunors folk, wbo bp aoventure fall 
3n fellowship, ano pilgrims were tbep all 
Gbat towaros Canterbury woulo rtbe 



scene above: TABARD INN s SOUTHWARK 



CAMPUS 
EVENTS 




FACULTY 

Brother Fidelian, who has just completed his 
Ph.D. work at Catholic University, has returned to 
LaSalle as assistant professor of English, and will 
be moderator of the Collegian. 

ADDITION 

Little opportunity to put their knowledge to prac- 
tical use has long been the complaint of LaSalle 
College students, weary of mirror-monologues. 
This era, however, has ended this year with the 
opening of the College's ultra-modern Language 
Laboratory. 

MALVERN RETREAT 

The weekend offers the retreatent an excellent 
opportunity to free himself from the distractions of 
everyday living and enjoy a few hours of reflective 
solitude. Reservations will be honored on a first- 
come, first-served basis. A five dollar deposit is re- 
quired with all reservations. 



I stood and watched the endless sea 
Beat restlessly onto the shore 
It tossed and turned and could not sleep, 
Then rose and fell once more. 

Now overhead a band of gulls 

In maddening dizzy circles fly. 

And, mocking, scream a shrill death dirge, 

A laughing, haunting mourners cry. 

A breeze drifts by and steals my thoughts, 
Pale muffled whisper of stale beer. 
Mix logic mine and whine of gull 
For shattered glass and butts to hear. 

Forbidding dunes are cold to touch 
That other dawns had deemed a bed, 
I once was child enough to wish 
For summer suns when summer'd fled. 




PERSONAL PATTER 



jpf 



By John Clement '39 



6> 




'35 Lt. Col. Edward J. McCool is deputy 
chief of staff for the Pacific 
Transportation Terminal command at 
Fort Mason, California. Colonel McCool 
has been with the army fourteen years. 

'54 Frank O'Hara former co-captain of the 
Basketball team, has been selected by 
U.S. District Judge Thomas J. Clary to 
serve as his law clerk. John McShane, 
his wife Joan and their two children 
are back from an extended vacation in 
Alaska, thanks to Uncle Sam. 



Ah me, too lyrical, too melancholy, too young. 
What will become of me— what became of the oth- 
ers, probably. I'll grow older, that's obvious. A 
step in the right direction— deal with the obvious. 
I'll grow duller, that's a relief. Trauma is getting 
dull, anyway. It shouldn't be bad, really. Maybe I'll 
be too busy to think about it. Which shows I'm 
still very young, thinking about the future. "I be- 
lieve it to be true that dreams are the true inter- 
preters of our inclinations; but there is art re- 
quired to sort and understand them." 

Montaigue, Essays 



THIS MONTH'S "DIAPER OF THE MONTH 
AWARD" GOES TO DOMINIC AND JOAN 
DOUGHERTY, '38. BABY TERRENCE JOINED THE 
DOUGHERTY CLAN MAY 25, 1957 AND THINGS 
ARE AGAIN EQUAL IN THE DOUGHERTY 
HOUSEHOLD, SIX BOYS AND SIX GIRLS. 





} 



colleg 




When the Brothers took over the Filbert and 
Juniper Street property, the neighborhood 
was a fairly quiet one— no noise or annoyance 
from traffic or the like. Later, when the Ma- 
sonic Temple was built and, especially, when 
the public buildings were erected on what 
had been a public square, traffic by the col- 
lege became so much more noticeable that it 
became imperative to move to a more quiet 
section. 

Ten Decades of Education— 1945 





*a£?& 








Bulletin 



In the community adjoining LaSalle College can be found a 
dazzling display of the social, economic and political diversity 
which characterizes urban America— but which is all too often 
sorted out into one-dimension neighborhoods of stratified, 
polarized populations. No safe harbor for middle class living, no 
planner's "renewed" Utopia and no urban ghetto— the north- 
west Philadelphia community centered around historic German- 
town is instead many things to its varied residents and observ- 
ers, and, most important of all, potentially whatever its in- 
habitants have the will and capacity to make of it. 

The casual observer may well note first the evidence of the 
problems which have come to characterize our cities— blight, 
alienated youths, disfunctional services, etc. But a closer look 
will reveal a wealth of human energy at work rebuilding, creat- 
ing new models for meeting educational, recreational, econom- 
ic and health needs, generating the ideas, practices, per- 
spectives and experiences that can bring about the rebirth of 
the American urban community. 

In short, LaSalle students are privileged to touch, however 
briefly, however lightly, an urban community with deep roots in 
the continuing American experience, a community nourished by 
the diverse strength and cultures of its people, a community 
scarred but undefeated by the failures of our basic institutions, 
a community welcoming change because there cannot be 
growth without change— a community to which the future be- 
longs because its people will create the future out of their com- 
plete experience with the present. The Renaissance of our 
cities is not a spectator sport. 

LaSalle's Urban Studies Center seeks to involve the human, 
academic, and material resources of the college in the service 
of this community's self-directed development, and, in return, to 
utilize the wealth of experiential knowledge available through 
community involvement to broaden the base and purpose of 
the educational experience for all LaSalle Students. 

-LA SALLE URBAN STUDIES CENTER, 1972 




«fc*i*9*! 



- ■•-.5 




11 



Smoking Regulations 

Smoking is prohibited at any time in 
all classrooms and laboratories; inside 
the College auditorium and Union 
theatre and on the stages; in the Mu- 
sic Room of the College Union; inside 
the Faculty residence; in any part of 
Benilde Hall or Leonard Hall. Smoking 
is permitted outside of all buildings; in 
designated areas such as the corri- 
dors of College Hall, the lobby of the 
auditorium, the stairwells of all build- 
ings excepting Behilde Hall; the corri- 
dors and meeting rooms of the Col- 
lege Union; and, in general, wherever 
ashtrays have been officially provided 
for this purpose. 







IT'S SILLY TO BE DEPRESSED BY IT. 




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Dress 

All students are expected to dress 
as college gentlemen when on 
campus, particularly during those 
times when classes are in session. 
The wearing of coat, shirt and tie is 
required in the classroom. The only 
exception is the wearing of a sweater 
with an earned LaSalle athletic letter 
attached. The wearing of Bermuda 
shorts is specifically prohibited on 
campus. 



W 








NOT THAT I'D LIKE TO SLEEP IN A BOX, MIND YOU, NOT WITHOUT ANY AIR 




SfilBE"? r ~ 




14 




Explorer's Rock (to the tune of "Rock Around the Clock") 

Let's go explorer team, let's go LaSalle; 

Let's go explorer team, let's go LaSalle; 

Let's go explorer team, let's go LaSalle; 

We're gonna rock around the court tonight. 

Well it's L-A-S-A-L-L-E 

We're gonna rock right on to victory 

We're gonna rock around the court tonight 

We're gonna rock, rock, rock to broad daylight. 

We're gonna rock, gonna rock around the court tonight. 

Cheers 

1 Put it up, Blue and Gold! Put it up! (clap-clap) 
Put it up, Blue and Gold! Put it up! (clap-clap) 

2 Pick it up, Blue and Gold! Pick it up! (clap-clap) 
Pick it up, Blue and Gold! Pick it up! (clap-clap) 

3 We fight good; We fight well. When we fight, 
We fight like L-A-S-A-L-L-E! 

4 Let's go explorers! clap, clap, clap, clap, clap. 

5 CHANT: 
Go-o-o-o-o Explorers! 
BEAT (opponent) 

College Colors: Navy Blue and Gold. 
College Mascot: Space Explorer. 




15 





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EVEN TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE 
FACT THAT YOU'RE DEAD, IT ISN'T 
A PLEASANT THOUGHT. 
ESPECIALLY IF YOU'RE DEAD, 
REALLY . . . ASK YOURSELF, IF I 
ASKED YOU STRAIGHT OFF-I'M 
GOING TO STUFF YOU IN THIS BOX 
NOW, WOULD YOU RATHER BE 
ALIVE OR DEAD? 




LaSalle College Alma Mater 
Above Explorers valliant, here 

under thine eyes 
Thy Blue and Gold banners 

unfurl in the skies; 

Chorus 

LaSalle, LaSalle, thy glory, 
thy triumphs we praise; 

Thy name in song, forever we, 
thy sons, shall raise. 

Here armed, thy scions stand- 
ing await thy command; 

Thou fortress of faith in our 
God and our land. 

Repeat Chorus 

LaSalle College Fight Song 

Fight, fight, fight, fight; 

fight, on Explorers; 

fight on for L.S.C. 

Give 'em "L" 

Give 'em "A" 

Give 'em "S-A-L-L-E" 

So fight on to victory. 

Repeat 



"The union is the community center of the col- 
lege, for all the members of the college fami- 
ly—students, faculty, administration, alumni and 
guests. It is not just a building; it is also an organi- 
zation and a program. Together they represent a 
well-considered plan for the community life of the 
college. "As the 'living room' or the 'hearthstone' 
of the college, the union provides for the services, 
conveniences, and amenities the members of the 
college family need in their daily life on the 
campus and for getting to know and understand 
one another through informal association outside 
the classroom. "The union is part of the educa- 
tional program of the college. 

"As the center of college community life, it 
serves as a laboratory of citizenship, training stu- 
dents in social responsibility and for leadership in 
our democracy. 

"Through its various boards, committees, and 
staff, it provides a cultural, social, and recreational 
program, aiming to make free time activity a coop- 
erative factor with study in education. 

"In all its processes it encourages self-directed 
activity, giving maximum opportunity for self-real- 
ization and for growth in individual social com- 
petency and group effectiveness. Its goal is the de- 
velopment of persons as well as intellects. 

"The union serves as a unifying force in the life 
of the college, cultivating enduring regard for and 
loyalty to the college." 




YOU'D HAVE A CHANCE 
AT LEAST YOU COULD 
LIE THERE 

THINKING-WELL, AT 
LEAST I'M NOT DEAD. 





Religious Activities 

Daily Mass is said for the students 
at 7:25, 7:55 and 12:25. Confessions 
are heard daily during Mass and also 
from 12:00 to 12:25. 

Devotions to Our Lady of the Mira- 
culous Medal are held weekly during 
the evening hours for resident stu- 
dents and students in the Evening Di- 
vision. 

First Friday devotions consisting of 
Masses, and Benediction honor the 
Sacred Heart each month. 

All Catholic students are required to 
make one retreat each year. They may 
fulfill this requirement by a week-end 
retreat at St. Joseph's-in-the-Hills Re- 
treat House in Malvern, Pa., or at St. 
Pius X Retreat House in Blackwood, 
near Camden, New Jersey, or by mak- 
ing the three-day retreat held on 
campus each year during the first 
three days of Holy Week. Arrange- 
ments for week-end retreats may be 
made through the Office of the Chap- 
lain. 

A special Mass is celebrated to 
honor St. Barbara, the Patron Saint of 
Artillerymen, which all members of the 
R.O.T.C. unit of the College attend in 
uniform. 



IN A MINUTE SOMEONE'S GOING TO BANG ON THE LID AND 
TELL ME TO COME OUT. "HEY YOU, WHATSYERNAME! 
COME OUT OF THERE! 



MWH 




19 




21 



kkom 




Mister Kerr comes from the asylum not far from my house, 

Quite close in fact if you go by way of the railroad tracks. 

A beautiful little man who looks like my Grandfather 

before he died. Grandfather lived at the asylum too. 

But Mister Kerr loves children and Grandfather never could 

because the children threw rocks from the tracks at crazy men 

who might happen to smile at them and give away candy. 

But Mister Kerr, boy, he'd give them a sucker or a chew 

and the kids loved him, and the rocks bounced off him like candy 

and the kids asked him why he loved them and rocks didn't hurt? 

And he said, "Candy gives you pep gives you pep gives you pep." 

Which Grandfather never believed when Mister Kerr told him. 

—Jane Cotterell 



22 



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I shall propose a toast (inhale, assume pompous 
stance): To all the skeedie-deedies and the kikus, 
the subway brats and the country girls (gone 
bad?), the ying-yangs and the foxy ladies (breath), 
those spaced-out and those reigned-in (pant), to 
(oh, bother; swallow) 

— Regina O'Toole Sokas 

Sources and Credits: 

LaSalle Urban Studies Center; LaSalle Magazine, 
1957; My Friend of My Youth, Jane Cotterell, 1952; 
You At LaSalle (Student Handbook), 1961-64; Bob 
Lyons and his publications picture file; Tom Stop- 
pard, of Rosencrantz & Gildenstern Are Dead bril- 
liance; Ten Decades of Education (put out by the 
Christian Brothers), 1945; The Flying Fingers of 
Pat Haydt; Leanore Yarrow's nimbleness with the 
typewriter; and Vince Bruno, Gene Flynn, and 
Steve Harris took the pictures. 



24 



riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, 
from swerve of shore to bend of bay, 
brings us by a commodius vicus of 
recirculation back to Howth 
Castle and Environs. 



Here Comes Everybody 






Faces 

Faces telling stories, 
giving impressions. 

Leading mindless bodies; 
pushing, bumping, grinding 
across streets through hallways, 
upstairs and down, 
to work and to houses; saying 
"Excuse me!" for miss directed feet 

Faces telling stories, 

looking good. 
Clean shaved and hairy 

Avon and Ivory 
Primmed for the occassion of man. 

Perfumed and bejeweled 

Hair styled and un-styled 
"Hey you're looking good!" 

But not looking. 

Faces telling stories? 

Saying nothing 
Moving through crowds of the faceless 
Silent in their agony of digested commercials 

Right Guard and Credit, 

March of Dimes, then May Lai. 
Faces behind hair and perfumed, 

behind mascara and shades, 

Not facing it. 

— Frazier Thompson 




Welcome 

Cringe the living, 

love the dead, 
Kill the pictures up ahead. 
Crush the image all in pieces, 

and then, 
Welcome my child 

and sit down, forever. 

—Diane Bones 







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Lighthouse Keeper fo Harf Crane 

He watches the dolphin-wing, 
And traces the constellation of the snail; 
Amusing portents: the sluice and rib of 
Dismasted ships; corporants blazing 
White the hollows of the fabric above. 
And still his salt-spray eyes sail 

Across the illustrated seas; 
His sagas skim the waves 
And toil under seaweed spices, 
Bound for his island grave. 

Where the western sky greets 
The foreign tides in bold 
Architectures assaulting beach; 
There lies his quadrant fold- 
Argosy, poised on lusty gunwales; 
The spume beyond the perimeters 
Of seismic hulls; and mariners 
Made liquid, harbor and cull 
The stranded valves and locks— 
Now the lair of the gypsy winch 



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And half-breeds on the saline docks. 

He knows these tunes, their sounds and pitch, 

The flow of ale, and the whip of ships: 

Simple knots on an indigo screen— 

His home is forever beyond the timbered beam; 

A glossy beacon, a flood, a dream. 

—I. David Shaffer 



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Elizabeth 



—Anne Maxwell 




Pimpernel! 

"The female Pimpernell differeth not from the male in any one 

point, but in the colour of the floures ..." 



Prologue 

Note how the whited moon above this land 
Breaks never amber, never near the earth, 
Yet casts a crystal stream upon the sand 
And binds the island in its silver girth. 
Confounded are the common elements 
That know the moon shines not without the sun. 
Yet sibling males provide no increment 
Unto this reign. Fair England will have none. 
No prime celestial body here provides 
Its condescending warmth upon the days. 
Alone the slender moon maintains the tides 
And guides, aloof in her sequestered haze. 
Note how the island governed in its night 
Is shone upon, and does not want for light. 



Historians puzzle, yet often tend to die before their eyes close. But, for Eliza- 
beth I, life still warms long since blood has ceased to flow. Her English reign 
filled court and kingdom with music, dance, and ceremony; while she sus- 
tained a precarious balance of religious tolerance, economic stability, and 
political finesse. It is with a sense of Elizabeth as enigma, however, that 
these sonnets are written. The sonnets presented here are only part of a 
longer sequence yet in the making. The primary source of information for 
these poems is Elizabeth the Great by E. Jenkins. Supplementary text is 
from the Gerard's Herball of Marcus Woodward, and illustrations from that 
work have been skillfully reproduced by Olga Howard. 




Burre-Reed 

"They plentifully grow in the fenny grounds of Lincolnshire 

and in the ditch right against the place of execution ..." 

I 

The realm of scholars will dispute at length 
Your mother's marriage: moralists pursue 
Your mother's issue, and that subtle strength 
That made her wife to him who fathered you. 
What trickeries, enticements had she spoken 
To hook and catch and manacle his heart 
That nuptial laws by merest whim were broken 
And loyalties to God were cracked apart? 
How mothered she, how sired he that dark tide 
Of goodly men in gruesomest procession? 
And she, no less, even as they had died 
Only vowed Elizabeth's succession. 
Heir to scholars' queries evermore: 
Daughter of a queen or of a whore? 



Daffodils 

"Galen saith, That the roots . . . have such wonderful qualities in 
drying, that they consound and glew together very great 
wounds, yea and such gashes or' cuts as happen about the 
veins, sinues, and tendons." 



IV 



Sits Privy Council here in rapt conclave 
Dealing affairs of state as in a dance, 
Poor Catholics and inflated coin to save 
And bandages for agitated France. 
Chronologies of battles blight and mar 
The histories where your predecessors sought 
Prestige embodied in the bowels of war. 
Contrariwise, but wisely, you would not. 
How many mornings diligent you reigned 
So like a balm of calming tincture spread 
And bid your eager warriors be constrained, 
Gave bridling to that bristling monster's head. 
Aware of scars you charge could ill afford 
To open new, you vowed: "No war, my Lords!' 









Madder 

"It stencheth bleeding, mitigateth inflammations, and helpeth 

those parts that be hurt and brused." 



II 

Elizabeth, in isolation bound 
Restricted by your birth's blood in the tower 
Foreheard you there the madrigal's sweet sound 
That brightly would become your better hour? 
There kept in prudent, modulated dress 
Fiercely savoring your claim to life 
Heard you then the populace profess 
Your name upon a land where death was rife? 
As England burned her bodies in the streets 
And yet her thirsting spirit went unsated 
Patient you persisted in retreat 
Until the brand of conscience had abated. 
Knew you then that steeped in smokey death 
The people longed for their Elizabeth? 



Bawme 

"Bawme drunke in wine is good against the bitings of venomous 

beasts, comforts the heart, and driveth away all melancholy and 

sadnesse." 

Ill 



The season, being April, gave itself 
Unto growing privett flowers and pinks. 
One child, warm witness of the season's wealth 
Graced your cloisterdom with ivy links. 
But tower wardens marked him foul a witness 
A threat their narrow post should not allow. 
Deferred in his third spring, he told: "O Mistress, 
I can bring you no more flowers now." 
For what can gaoler's sons know of the world 
Or wars or wants or politics or queens. 
What wider world encompassed this young churl 
But for the season's passing shades and greens. 
And if you told your varied joys, in summing 
Was not best— this flower bringer's coming? 



Dandelions 

"They are found often in meadows, neere unto ditches, as also 

in gardens and high wayes much trodden." 



All crowding, crouching, fronting streets of stores, 
Of shops, all gathering and gossipping 
Are mailers, joiners, burgesses and boors, 
With tight-ribbed dogs afoot.— And children sing. 
"Look there!" the husky tanner tells his boy. 
Behind the mounted Garter-King-of-Arms 
Comes fair Eliza, Queen of second Troy, 
A fine brocade of gilt and maiden charms. 
Though bald his children's feet upon the land, 
Though thin his daily profit's meager sum, 
The yeoman counts himself as no poor man 
And wants for naught if Oriana come. 

Bright process shores the kingdom's straining 

treasure 

And gives the poor delight in boundless 

measure. 

7 




Apples of Love 

"The Golden Apple, with the whole herbe it selfe is cold . . . But 
in my judgement it is very cold, yea perhaps in the highest de- 
gree of coldness ..." 



VI 



Trimmed, beribboned, corseted in bone, 

Encircled, galleried in yards of skirt 

Your portraiture, perpetually alone, 

Masks, denies, belies a lover's hurt. 

Beneath embroidered quilts you never churned 

Or so these frigid replicas announce. 

Whatever woman weakened, loved, or yearned 

A man was one that you would but denounce. 

Invulnerable, immaculate and pure 

Perpetuity in stiffened lace 

ageless lady, smilingly demure, 

Convince the ages you were ever chaste. 
Convince the ages: no man ever could 
Have passed the portals of your womanhood. 





Sweet Williams 

"These plants are kept and maintained in gardens more for to 

please the eyes, than either the nose or belly. " 

VII 

"The face I grant I might well blush to offer . . ." 
Your eloquence gives fitting indication 
That you exposed your features to no scoffer 
But confident of mind controlled the nation. 
Yet still we see your form in varied pose 
In state, at courts, or picnicking on hunts. 
In Welbeck Abbey, carved on cameos, 
Your face we view in profile or full front. 
Your governance is not without our deference 
We've books to boast what artists never saw. 
Yet by our eyes we disregard your preference: 
Your face is more familiar than your law. 
So blaming art, I ask, can we be blamed 
For looking least where you were least ashamed? 






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"Disorder, disorder, I cannot be blamed for all this 

disorder." 

The song, the old song, come on god damn; 

The old man weeps, 

His hair mouse grey 

And mixed with snow, 

Give him a song now 

For look you, he withdraws. 

Disorder indeed, and did you mark the way 
He stumbled up the stairs? 

The court does not darken for an old man, 
For strong words spoken softly— 
So going out when doors close 
The fools know all the words 
But cannot set them straight. 

Lords, sing now if you can! 

Oh, what a marvelous funeral we'll have 

When all the good men come out 

And all the sins forgiven 

We'll watch that solemn bier 

And sing you 

Look! his shadow goes 

And winter is icummen in; 

The new songs are all written down 

But wait the final word. 

-WJB 




Daedalus Below 



Scribed on walls of verdigris 
Are names: spray glyphs 
Of black boys— a corner, a street. 
The half-light elucidates the tracks— 
Circumnabulations in a submerged labyrinth, 
Where bull-bearing motors turn with speed, 
And stop, hermetically sealed under exits 
Of radiant throughfares. 

Beside the footworn furrows, the Minotaur waits. 
Dumb with grasping electrodes: inviolate coils 
Of the Beast, roaring by in triumph, red and green. 
"Next stop," on the tip of every tongue, 
Patient in the belly of each maze dweller: 
Beast or Man? 




A gyring turnstile feeds one into 
This rerun precinct: dull archways 
To invisible destinations; where silver gum wrappers 
Are wisked into pirouettes across the fury of the rails, 
Left to confuse the dark. 
Each whirlwind is uncontested: 
There is no Agean beyond the arteried traffic- 
Only stumps of transfer. 

The press of snarling bodies on the ramps 

Echoes a metalic harmony; island rythems quench 

Subterranean hungers, of cretins splay-footted in fashion. 

In the winding distance HE seems one-eyed, 

Shrugging to and fro, a white light: 

Intensity of prophesied voltage. 

Where is Ariadne, 

Where did I leave my twine, 

O Daedalus, to where did you fly? 

—I. David Shaffer 




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Other People's Children 



By R. Bernstein 



Running . . , long formal hall lit with soul-tapers . . . endless running . . . double doors heavy with 
baroque carving . . . civilized laughter and light music . . . in . . . must get in . . . doors open . . . 
room empty . . . room endless . . . move along the black marble squares on the floor . . . avoid 
the white . . . move slowly as stately double rows of Ionic columns rise around me . . . rise 
upward into the rushing roar of mad laughter above me . . . rise as I move squares-by-square . . . 
pawnlike . . . 

As I pulled myself up from the sweat soaked sheets that covered my body. I smelled nothing 
unusual. Perhaps, if I had paid closer attention, I would have noticed the complete absence of 
smell. The absence of smell. The absence of light. For even as I felt it mid-morning, no light 
penetrated the shades on my windows. Keep to the black squares. I acknowledged this remotely 
as one does in the daze of a blinding headache. I stubbed my toe on the end of the bedframe 
and winced, damn. Sweat rolled from my forehead, down my face, over my body. I collided with a 
doorframe, damn. 

Stepping into the shower, I turned on the cold water. It washed over me, swallowed me. It 
weakened me, cleansing me of the nightmare. Gradually the sound of the running water 
penetrated my brain. The coolness eased the dull aching at my temples, and I opened my eyes. I 
do not know how long I stood there with the water pouring over me. I wish I might still be 
standing there with the water pouring life over me. 

"How do you feel?" the voice from the doorway filtered through the shower splash, startled 
me into consciousness. "Any better than last night?" 

"Why? How did I feel last night?" 

"Lousy. Said you had the grand-daddy of all headaches and went to bed early. Any better 
now?" 

"Yes no I don't know. I think so. That's something anyway. If I can think. I must be better. 
Cogito ergo sum. I think, therefore I am. Reality. I am better. And now, I'm wet. Find me a towel 
in the closet, will you. They should be on the top shelf, if I remembered to put them away." 

I heard shuffling in the next room. 

"They were in the back room, Here." 

The voice handed me a towel, and I began to rub it against my skin. As I dried away the cool 
water, more sweat rose to take its place, damn. I did not want to move away from the cool tiles, 
black and white, of the shower stall. 

Stall. Stop. Halt. Cease. Stall. Animal stall. Barn. Cow. Sheep. Goat. 
"Is there any coffee ready downstairs?" I stepped out of the shower, and the voice answered me 
from the next room. 

"Coffee? The water's boiling. All we have in the house is instant. Do you mind?" 

"No, I don't mind. Why should this morning be different from any other? I really shouldn't drink 
coffee. Plays havoc with my stomach later on in the day. Can you see the clock? What does it 
say?" 

"Quarter past eleven. Are you late this morning? I didn't want to wake you any earlier after you 
felt so sick last night. Are you going to have any breakfast before you leave? What would you 
like?" 

The clock does not say, "Quarter past eleven. " I wrapped the towel around me and reached 
for the switch. It says, "tick, tick. " The light flickered on, and I saw myself in the mirror. Dumb 
clock; can't even tock! I turned the light out. What I can't see won't make me vomit, I thought. 
Through a mouth full of tooth-paste I tried to answer the last questions thrown at me. It was 
useless. The voice came around the corner, out of the bedroom, and into the doorway again. It 
laughed slightly seeing my predicament. It continued. 

"Oh, well then, shake your head. Is it all right? I mean being late today." Yes. "Want any 
breakfast before you go?" NO. 

I spat out the last of the toothpaste, cupped my hand under the spigget and filled my mouth 
with the cool water I collected. 

"It's dark in here. Why don't you turn on the light? How can you see what you're doing? Why 
don't you open the skylight and let in some fresh air?" 

I spat out the water and wiped my mouth with an end of the towel. The voice was all around 
me stabbing me with questions before I was finally able to speak. I addressed myself to my 
mirror-image. 

"In the first place, I don't want a light on." I turned it out again. "In the second place, I did not 
know the skylight was closed. I'd forgotten completely about the skylight." I passed the slightly 
shrunken voice in the doorway, a place it had reclaimed. "As for fresh air, I don't think I would 
recognize it if it slid under my nose and saluted." 

I stopped by it and spoke carefully, very carefully. "Thank you for letting me sleep late. I don't 
mean to snap at you." Only the black squares. 



I turned the corner back into the bedroom. The voice followed me and again took up position 
in the doorway. Turning slowly toward it, I realized for the first time how tentative a thing it was. 
In doorways, on the edges of chairs, coming or going. Day after day it went on, pausing only 
long enough for me to acknowledge its presence. The appetite sickens, and so dies. I stared 
and, for the moment, thought I saw into it— and through it. A pale, shadowless voice asked on. 

"Still not feeling well? Maybe you'd better see a doctor. You have too many headaches lately. 
Can I get you some aspirin? Do you think you're coming down with something? Can I do 
anything for you?" 

The sweat began to pour down my body again. I went to the window and drew down the 
shade it had lifted. The headaches, gone only a few minutes ago, now raged in my forehead and 
tore great gaping holes in my brain, I felt every muscle in my face tighten and quiver to the beat 
of pain that throbbed mercilessly at my temples. I finished dressing in silence so audible that the 
voice trailed off, its last query hung pendulously in mid-air— unanswered. Can I do anything for 
you? 

The coffee was almost bitter and very hot. It sat opposite me, peering at me through some 
invisible lens. Every line in my face, every trace of thought magnified itself in that lens. After 
weighing and analyzing, it stored all the information in some vast manilla folder labeled "odd, 
■ but useless" at the back of its mind. I pushed back the cover slide and left it to seek its 
definition elsewhere. Stalemate. It would be there when I returned. 

A fresh breeze washed over me as I walked to my car. After trying, and failing, to put the trunk 
key into the ignition, I sensed a familiar perfume— the acrid stench of decaying flesh. I looked to 
my right. It sat there. The other one. Its legs curled up under its body. Black flames of eyes 
blazed out at me. The tongues of those flames searing the flesh on my face. This thing always 
frightened me. 

Where its alter ego merely vexed me by its presence, annoyed me into reluctant movement, 
this cowed me into submission. We played no guessing games. I knew what it felt. It hated me, 
loathed me even as it was tied to me. Sometimes long nails flashed toward me, gauging at the 
flesh of my throat. It hung on until I shouted, writhing, begging for release. To the gates of Hell, 
or something very near, it brought me time after time. But, no matter how I longed to, I could 
never cross over. Endless running. It could never quite let me go. 

I started the car and drove off. 

"Where are you going?" 

I laughed. "Don't you know? You tell me. Where am I going? You are supposed to tell me, 
aren't you? I thought those were the rules we agreed to. Isn't that the game? Well?!" 

It hissed and slithered closer to me. "Rules? We had no choice, darling. I hate you." The eyes 
warmed slightly in anticipation. "You have no plans, unless you want to spend the rest of the 
day with me. Is that it? Then by all means stay with me. Won't you? Darling." 

Closer still. I felt one of the nails on the thin, finely veineo hand start a slow trip from the 
hairline on my neck down to my collar. My foot hit hard on the accelerator. I began to pray for a 
brick wall to loom up mercifully in my path. When nothing appeared, I pulled over and parked in 
front of my office. It grew angry. Eyes turned bright red, and threads of curses garbled from the 
throat through a blood-red slash— its mouth. 

Mechanically I walked to the heavy double doors. I glanced back at the car as I stepped into 
the empty room. It would be there when I returned. 





Loon Dance 

My grandfather speaks: 

In the morning, at the first false light, 

the loons danced upon the lake for us. 

Your Uncle Tom, who died when you were small, 

and I had hiked from Skow the afternoon 

before. We set off through the hills, and reached 

the lake in time to see the sun go down. 

It hung above the pines and stretched our shadows 

longer and longer behind us; it dropped 

behind the trees and tarnished the whole forest; 

and when it went away and the birds flew 

home for the night, we built a fire and watched 

the smokey flames cast shadows on the lake. 

We slept after lying awhile listening 

to the water: no dark corners to watch, 

but darkness all around, and just the dying 

gold of our dark pinefire to know directions 

by. In the blue half-light, we woke hours 

later. The dew had started to grow. Grayly 

down on the lake, the loons were dancing. 

They threw out their wings, turning and turning, 

half obscured by the mist. They whirled in rows 

like shakers, and were dressed like Mennonites 

in their drab feathers. By the time the sun 

came back to see their dance, they'd flown away. 

Tom and I had bobbed our heads like loons 

to keep from being seen. We watched from 

behind a blackberry bush, both afraid 

we'd sneeze, and both embarrassed to be present 

at a loon dance, that early in the morning. 

wonder, Tom said later, as we walked 
along an orange-needled path toward home, 
if after doing whatever loons do 
during the day, they come to dance in darkness 
on the lake before they sleep. I said I 
didn't know, and thought about it in silence 
as your uncle and I descended the hill 
and walked beneath the pinetrees toward Skowhegan. 

—Timothy Dlugos 




19 



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Wellwish 

Carry hence this knit we knit 

In our concourse, 

Into the sundering breadth and length 

Of looming futures. 




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Of dustdevils and windfalls 

In the heyday of sixteen seasons, 

Carry what we wove, 

Between this built and that broken 

In a wild miscellany 
And whirl of riddling doors, 
The knitting each to each 
With unfrayed cords. 

And begone in dearest doom 
On the westering miles 
With your unruly shadow 
At heel, like Tuesday's child. 

And when the halls are down 
Fix their memory 

In the burying and breeding earth 
With a long hearts-ease. 



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«♦ 




—Henry Jankiewicz 




Faces Frazier Thompson 

Welcome Diane Bones 

Lighthouse Keeper I. David Shaffer 

Elizabeth I Anne Maxwell 

Disorder— A Necromance for E.P WJB 

Daedalus Below I. David Shaffer 

Other People's Children R. Bernstein 

Loon Dance Timothy Dlugos 

Personality Theories: A Case History Jeffrey Gibbons 

Wellwish Henry Jankiewicz 

Charles Darwin! Timothy Dlugos and WJB 

Cover Quote James Joyce 

lllus. for Lighthouse Keeper Joe Urbanik 

lllus. for Elizabeth I Olga Howard 

Photographers Vince Bruno 

Steve Harris 
Mary Day 

Editor W. J. Badecker 



23 



Charles Darwin, where are you 

Now that we need you? 

Our serpents have turned to fish, 

Algae revolting backward. 

When will we reach trees, 

Or have we already? 

This is a crazy slithering train, Charles Darwin! 




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SUICIDE PREVENTION CENTER 

Room 430. City Hall Annex, MU 6-4420 (24-hr. telephone service) 
Trained star) will help disturbed people, around the clock. 



Atomic Sam, whom you will meet 

Within these pages, short and sweet, 

Invites you all to come with him [if you are so inclined], 

With peach-hued specs and guileless air 

To Candid-Candid Land— that's where 

The Bird and others will help him to show you what's to 

find. 



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So long now! Candid-Candid Land 

Is to your liking— is it? 

Atomic Sam sure does hope so; 

And waits for your next visit! 




24 



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. . . Take from me the hope 
that I can change the future 
and you will send me mad. 
William Shakespeare 



LA SALLE COLLEGE 



EVENING DIVISION 



CLASS OF 1 972 



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THE STAFF OF THE EVENING DIVISION SECTION OF THE EXPLORER 

VINCENT C. HEHL, ASSOCIATE EDITOR-EVENING DIVISION 

JOHN J. SCHWARYN, CO-ORDINATING EDITOR 

JOSEPH VARGA, PHOTO EDITOR 

MICHAEL J. McGRANAGHAN, ASSISTANT EDITOR 

PHOTO STAFF-BRUCE CAVANAUGH, BENJAMIN NOLAN, 
MARTIN HOLLOWAY, JAMES A. MURDAH JR. 

STAFF-ROBERT R. VERNA, NANCY DURKIN, MARTHA WARD, 
TONI STABILITO, RONNIE NEARY, JAMES WOLF 
JOHN THOMAS. 

COVER DESIGN-LINDA BASTIAN 

3 









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JOSEPH H. ANDREANO. JR. . .. 516 Allison 
Apts. . . . Marlton, N.J. . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 

THOMAS J. ARDECKI ... 250 Orchard Ave.. 
Somerdale. N.J. . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING . . . 
E.D. Accounting Association— Treasurer, Senior 
Class— Co-Chairman. 

VINCENT E. BELLINO ... 835 Wedgewood 
Drive, Lansdale. Pa. 19446 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING . . Student Congress Representa- 
tive. 



CHARLES BLAKEMORE . . . 5828 Sanson St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19139 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 

CHARLES H. BLUMBERG . . . 2227 E. Darby 
Rd., Havertown, Pa. 19083 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING . . . Student Congress Representa- 
tive. 

RONALD P. BOYLE ... 7812 Bayard St., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 19150 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 





17 S. School Lane, 
B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 



DANIEL J. BRENNAN 
Souderton, Pa. 18964 
ING. 

JOHN PATRICK CALLAN, JR 88 Bethlehem 

Pike, Ambler, Pa. 19002 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 

THOMAS R. CAMASSO ... 1541 Muhlenberg 
Drive. Norristown, Pa. 19403 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 



WILLIAM F. CHAPMAN. JR. ... 436 Madison 
Ave., Hatboro, Pa. 19040 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING . . . Accounting Association— Member, Sen- 
ior Class— Co-Chairman. 

JOHN M. CHECCHIA ... 11804 Colman Rd., 
Philadelphia, Pa. . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING . . . 
Alpha Sigma Lambda, Honor Society. 
STANLEY A. CHMIEL, JR. ... 10915 Carey 
Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 





GERALD M. CONWAY ... 11 Merion Lane, Will- 
ingboro, N.J. 08046 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
JAMES J. COPPOLA, JR. ... 812 Knorr St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING . . . S. A.M. —Member, Marketing Associ- 
ation—Member. 

PAUL COSENZA . . . 2750 Woodland Ave., Ros- 
lyn, Pa. 19001 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 



MICHAEL COSTELLO ... 465 Cedar Ave., Lan- 
sdale, Pa. 19446 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
ALBERT F. COSTON ... 14 Yale Rd., Atco, N.J. 
08004 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 

JOHN H. DONAHUE, JR 701 Elizabeth Ave., 

Lindenwold, N.J. 08021 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 





GEORGE CARL EHEMANN ... 215 E. Fisher 
Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 ... B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 

WILLIAM H. FINCK ... 26 J Millside Manor, Del- 
ran, N.J. 08075 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
THOMAS J. FINN ... 3412 Decatur St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19136 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 



JOSEPH E. FINNEY .543 Pine Tree Rd., Jen- 
kintown, Pa. 19046 . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING 
DANIEL A. FITZGERALD . . . 7728 Devon St., 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19118 . B.S IN ACCOUNT- 
ING . Senior Class— Co-Chairman. 
HENRY FLICK... 511 Evergreen Court. Corn- 
wells Heights, Pa. 19020 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 




** 



itilJicJ 



THOMAS J. FORD. JR. . . . 844 Kohn St.. Norris- 
town, Pa. 19401 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING . . . 
Accounting Association— Member. 
ROBERT R. FROMNIC ... 3611 Sussex Lane. 



Philadelphia Pa. 19114 

ING. 

OLAFS GAIBISELIS . . 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 

ING. 



B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 



1804 Oakmont St., 
. B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 





JOHN GALLATIG ... 121 Thomas Penn Ave., 
Hatfield, Pa. 19440 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
DANIEL A. GIANNINI . . . 2146 South Garnet 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19145 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 

LARRY E. GOLBESKI ... 222 Rector St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19128 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 



GERALD J. HECKLER . . . 3033 Miller St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 

JOHN J. HUHA ... 603 Gardner Ave., Glenol- 
den, Pa. . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
ROBERT F. HUSTON . . . 3341 Morning Glory 
Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 ... B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 



JAMES G. JOHNSON, JR. ... 516 Commerce 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19023 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING . . . Accounting Associ- 
ation—Member. 

JAMES D. KEATING ... 240 W. Sulis Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
WILLIAM L. KEENAN ... 1815 Glendale Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 





JERRY JOHN KOPITSKY ... 112 Lockart Plaza 
. . . Philadelphia, Pa. 19116 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING . . . Senior Class-President, Ac- 
counting Association— Vice-President, Cross 
Keys, President's Council, Student Government. 
ROBERT A. KRAMER . . . 358 Fairway Terrace, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19128 .. . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING . . . Senior Class— Asst. Treasurer, Account- 
ing Association— Secretary, Student Govern- 
ment, Cross Keys. 

LAWRENCE EUGENE LESO . . . 5753 N. 6th 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 ... B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 



JOSEPH VINCENT LYNAM, JR. ... Regency 
Apts. B-36, Cornwell Heights, Pa. 19120 .. . B.S. 
IN ACCOUNTING. 

JOHN P. McHALE ... 944 Station Ave. Apt. D-2. 
Cornwell Heights, Pa. 19120 ... B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 

JAMES J. McNALLY ... 505 Plymouth Rd., 
Glenside, Pa. 19038 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 



JOHN FRANCIS MAHER . . . Towne Court Apts 
H-105, Norristown, Pa. 19400 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 

JOSEPH F. MORITZ . . . 6640 Tackawanna St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19135 .. . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 

ROBERT J. MOY . . . 3036 Fairfield St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19136 .. . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 




10 




'I wish he would explain his explanation 
Byron— Dedication to Don Juan 




Mr. O'Connor at Philco Ford Plant. Mr. O'Connor, like so many evening division instructors, 
bring a working experience to La Salle. 



12 



PAUL CHRISTIAN NICE . . . 1343 Southampton 



Road, Philadelphia. Pa. 19116 

COUNTING 

GEORGE C O'BRIEN, JR. . 

Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 19114 

COUNTING. 

JAMES F. O'CONNOR, JR. . . . 

Apt. 521-A2, Windsor Court, 

19020 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING 



B.S. IN AC 



3654 Sussex 
. B.S. IN AC- 




Frank O'Connor with two of the over thirty students he has 
helped find jobs at Philco and elsewhere. 



Mr. O'Connor, would you care to comment on the proposed changes in 
the Business Curriculum. 

In the spirit of trying to communicate this thing to the students I relayed 
my opinions to both my classes and the accounting association and that is 
being, having been an evening division student, working in industry, also 
tried to get into graduate school and found that I had to take five extra 
courses before I could get into graduate school. I am all for this program. 

I admit that it adds time to the student and an extra year is pretty tough to 
take, but I think just from a personal standpoint, knowing what I missed in 
there because of the lack of diversity. When I went and got my degree it was 
in the days of thirty courses, 120 credits, and you got out in five years, but 
you specialized and went right down the straight and narrow; you didn't vary 
and I wound up with something like forty credits in Accounting, something 
like that, with little or no deviation. I didn't have the necessary courses to get 
into graduate school. So I had to go back and take five extra courses, un- 
dergraduate courses, before I could even apply for graduate school. That 
was the first point and the second point was just what I encountered work- 
ing in business. And I think if you are in finance or accounting you are going 
to be involved in some business activities. And I think what I learned from 
the Industrial Management, marketing and finance areas, I got from ex- 
perience rather than books and I think a little bit of basic academic training, 
a little more varied would have been a lot more helpful to me. 

I do recommend it. It's tough to swallow, especially for the student who is 
half-way through now. I don't know what it does to them. I hate to think of 
the insurmountable academic problems they have trying to administer this 
thing but I'm sure that when they look back ten years from now, they will be 
glad. 



13 




EDWARD DAVID PASCOE, JR. . . . 533 W. 
Chapier Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 . . . B.S. 
IN ACCOUNTING. 

JOSEPH W. PLATT ... 837 Wedgewood Drive, 
Lansdale, Pa. 19446 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 
HARVEY M. RAGER . . . Johnson & Greene 
Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 .. . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 



LOUIS RAPATTONI ... 1835 Johnston Street, 
Apt. #8, Philadelphia, Pa. 19145 ... B.S. IN 
ACCOUNTING. 

THOMAS SCOTT RITTENHOUSE ... 418 Silver 
Avenue. Southampton, Pa. 18966 ... B.S. IN 
ACCOUNTING. 

ROBERT M. SHIMINSKE . . . 2951 Hellerman 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 . . . B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING . . . Student Congress. 






"Hey, kids, what time is it?" "It's Accounting 5 time!' 



JOHN D. SOUDER . . . 1284 Township Line 
Road. Phoenixville, Pa. 19460 ...B.S. IN AC- 
COUNTING. 

ROBERT F. SPEAR ... 453 Edge Hill Road, 
North Hills, Pa. 19038 ... B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING. 

ROBERT CHARLES SPILLMAN . . . Madison 
Manor Apartments, A203, Jenkintown, Pa. 
19046 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNTING. 



JAMES C. WOLF . . . 5944 Hasbrook Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 . . . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 
ING . . . Treasurer, Accounting Association; Stu- 
dent Congress; Treasurer, Senior Class; Alpha 
Epsilon; Cross Keys; Who's Who on American 
Campus. 

LEONARD YANKOFF . . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19136 
ING. 

RONALD A. ZABERER 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 
ING. 



3533 Ashville Street, 
. . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 



3760 Genesee Drive, 
. . B.S. IN ACCOUNT- 




15 




17 




ROBERT J. FINLEY (Bob) 
32 Years Old 
Married, four children 

Manager, Point of Feed Delivery System— Betz Laboratories 
"Night school has changed considerably, a distinct study in 
contrasts ... In 1961, the school was conservative, it now ap- 
pears to be ultra liberal ... a change for the better." 




ROBERT SHIMINSKE (Bob) 
30 Years old 
Married, two children 

Systems Officer— Philadelphia National Bank 
"I finally got through after 11 years. It has been amazing to find 
out that one could have so many friends without knowing any- 
thing about them, let alone their names." 



18 





iktid 




FELIX A. BARKOWSKI . . . 2202 Conrow Rd., 
Cinaminson, N.J. 08077 . . . B.S. IN MATH- 
EMATICS. 

JAMES ANTHONY CARR ... 600 E. Street Rd. 
Apt. d-112. Trevose, Pa. 19047 ... B.S. IN 
MATHEMATICS. 

LEON KOZIEWICZ ... 333 Lacey Ave. Apt. B-6, 
Doylestown, Pa. 18901 . . . B.S. IN MATHEMAT- 
ICS. 




JAMES P. MELLON ... 885 York Rd., Warm- 
inster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MATHEMATICS. 



PAUL E. MILLER ... 276 Iven Avenue Apt. 2A, 
Saint Davids, Pa. 19087 . . . B.S. IN MATH- 
EMATICS . . . Alpha Sigma Lambda. 





THOMAS J. OROURKE ... 12419 Wyndom Rd., 
Phila., Pa. 19154 .. . B.S. IN MATHEMATICS. 
JONATHAN J. PALMER ... 261 1 Laurel Drive, 
Bristol, Pa. 19007 ... B.S. IN MATHEMATICS 
. . . Student Congress Representative. 
CAESAR J. PRIMUS . . . 7261 Horrocks St., 
Phila., Pa. 19149 . . . B.S. IN MATHEMATICS . . . 
Alpha Sigma Lambda— Vice-President, Presi- 
dent . . . Academic Affairs Committee . . . Stu- 
dent Congress Representative. 



OLEG SERGE SAVINOV . . . Devonshire E., 
North Wales, Pa. 19454 . . . B.S. IN MATH- 
EMATICS. 

VINCENT P. VIOLA . . . 5910 Langdon St., 
Phila., Pa. 19149 .. . B.S. IN MATHEMATICS. 



20 



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ROBERT CHARLES ALLEN . . . 10832 Nandina 
Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 19116 . . . B.S. IN 
CHEMISTRY. 

RAYMOND C. FREISHIEM . . . 2052 Moreland 
Rd. Abington, Pa. 19001 . . . B.S. IN CHEM- 
ISTRY. Student American Chemical Society . . . 
Member Student Congress; Chairman, Athletic 
Association; President, Evening Division Basket- 
ball Association. 

RONALD W. GREXA . . . 2882 Cushing Road . . . 
Camden, N.J. B.S. IN CHEMISTRY. 





Joseph Bernier received his Bachelor's Degree in 
Psychology at Juniata College and his Master's Degree 
in Educational Psychology at Rutger's University. He 
has completed all of his doctoral work (with the ex- 
ception of his dissertation) in counseling and higher 
education at Penn State. Mr. Bernier is married and has 
three children, including a daughter who will enter La 
Salle College as a freshman in September. 

La Salle College has had Mr. Bernier's services as a 
teacher and counselor for eight years. He currently 
teaches Personnel Psychology in the evening and has 
taught Abnormal Psychology, General Psychology, and 
Personality Dynamics. His Personnel Psychology course 
sometimes reaches forty in attendance. 

The differences between day and evening students 
are almost non-existent, according to Mr. Bernier. "The 
evening student is directly concerned with the practical 
aspects of education and is motivated primarily from a 
vocational standpoint. The day student is usually more 
academically oriented and is learning for the sake of 
learning. He does not think in terms of the practical and 
vocational aspects of education." 

During the eight years Mr. Bernier has been a mem- 
ber of La Salle's faculty, he has heard comments from 
his colleagues that evening students are less capable. 
He has "not discovered anything to that extent," and 
sees no diversions of capability." The evening student 
is oriented differently. "It is a matter of emphasis. The 
evening student may place an emphasis on the degree 
because he believes it will make him a better person. He 
is already earning a living; whereas, the day student has 
to earn the degree and then go out to find a job. If we 
look for differences between day and evening students 
with regard to purpose, we are saying that they are in- 
herently different; they are only circumstantially differ- 
ent when you get down to the nitty gritty." 

Mr. Bernier's classes are an indication of his ex- 



periences along these lines. His master's work was 
done at night and he has experienced the time limita- 
tions that are basically a problem at night. However, he 
does not structure his classes any differently during the 
day. Both tests and results are the same. There is a 
freedom for questions and responses in both. "The eve- 
ning student may contribute more in class discussions 
because of his work experience" and Mr. Bernier is 
"pleased" with this. 

The recent opportunity for evening students to major 
in psychology is partially due to Mr. Bernier's contribu- 
tion and support. He serves on the ad hoc committee to 
revise the curriculum in the psychology department and 
is a member of the curriculum committee in the day di- 
vision. He is also the local president of the La Salle 
chapter of the AAUP. It is "not surprising" to him that 
there has been so much student interest in the new 
psychology major offered in the evening division. Even 
before the possibility and probability of such a program 
was discussed, students approached members of the 
department about it. Mr. Bernier is pleased to be associ- 
ated with it naturally, because the field of psychology is 
his "way of making a living." He feels that La Salle is to 
be commended for being one of the few schools in the 
country to offer such a degree. "There are so many col- 
leges that give adult-education courses— learn how to 
play bridge and gardening, or how to win friends and in- 
fluence people kind of courses. La Salle is to be con- 
gratulated on making such an opportunity available to 
evening students." 

The spirited Joe Bernier extends himself to his own 
students and other students outside of the classroom. 
He can be found in the snack bar on campus usually on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays between 6:00 and 7:00 P.M. 
He attends practically every La Salle home basketball 
game. 



26 



ROBERT KONEN 301 Heights Lane, Feas- 

terville, Pa. 19047 . . . B.S. IN CHEMISTRY. 
MICHAEL J. O'BRIEN ... 913 E. Mermaid Lane, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19118 ... B.S. IN CHEM- 
ISTRY. 

ARTHUR ROGOVE . . . Apt. 5B. Valley Road, 
Melrose Park, Pa. 19126 . . . B.S. IN CHEM- 
ISTRY. 





28 




29 




RUDY Dl PIETRO ... 1102 Richards Lane, 
Feasterville. Pa. 19047 . . . B.S. IN ELEC- 
TRONIC PHYSICS. 

JOHN F. FUGES . . . B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 
PHYSICS. 

JAMES C. HERMAN ... 718 Preston Lane, Hat- 
boro, Pa. 19040 . . . B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 
PHYSICS. 




ROBERT C. HILGHMAN ... 90 Rittenhouse 
Drive, Willingboro, N.J. 08046 . . . B.S. IN ELEC- 
TRONIC PHYSICS. IEEE. 

THERODORE T. HORNE, SR . . . 336 E. Vernon 
Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 19119 ... B.S. IN 
ELECTRONIC PHYSICS. 

LASZLO I. KOVACS ... 1155 York Road, Apt. 
D-4, Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN ELEC- 
TRONIC PHYSICS. IEEE; Alpha Delta Honor So- 
ciety. 



31 



ANDREW S. KUSHNEROCK ... 10910 Heflin 
Rd. Phila., Pa., 19154 . . . B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 
PHYSICS. 

MICHAEL LAPINSKY ... 46 Nestingrock Lane, 
Levittown, Pa., 19054 . . . B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 
PHYSICS. 

GERALD PAUL MILLER ... 36 Valleyview Drive, 
Fountainville, Pa., 18923 ... B.S. IN ELEC- 
TRONIC PHYSICS. 




SAMUEL URBANE MURRAIN 

teenth St., Phila., Pa., 19141 . 

TRONIC PHYSICS. 

EUGENE PREVOST ... 242 Cobalt Ridge Dr., 

Levittown, Pa., 19057 . . . B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 

PHYSICS. 



32 



LEON MARTIN ROTHAMEL . . . 6829 Waldorf 

St., Pennsauken, N.J. . . . B.S IN ELECTRONIC 

PHYSICS 

HOWARD B. ROZRAN . . . 2047 S. John Russell 

Circle, Elkins Park, Pa., 19117 ... B.S. IN 

ELECTRONIC PHYSICS 

EDWARD JOSEPH SHARKEY. JR. . . . 1131 Da- 

ger Rd , Warminster, Pa., 18974 . B.S. IN 

ELECTRONIC PHYSICS 

DONALD TARQUINI .325 Kohler Ave.. Atco., 

N.J., 08004 . . B.S IN ELECTRONIC PHYSICS. 

IEEE. 



27 Heather Road, 
B.S. IN PHYSICS. 



JOHN P. THOMAS, JR. 

Churchville, Pa. 18966 

IEEE. 

MACK R. TIPTON . . 5131 Hutchinson Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19141 . . . B.S. IN PHYSICS. 

GEORGE H. WALTER . 3247 Azalea Avenue, 

Trevose, Pa. 19047 ... B.S. IN ELECTRONIC 

PHYSICS. IEEE. 




THOMAS E. WEINER . . . 6633 Eastwood Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 ... B.S. IN ELEC- 
TRONIC PHYSICS. lEEE-Vice-President. 
CHARLES DECKER WRIGLEY . . . 1644 Jarret- 
town Road, Dresher, Pa. 19025 ... B.S. IN 
ELECTRONIC PHYSICS. 



33 



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JAMES C. BUCK ... 131 W. Gravers Lane, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19118 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 

RAYMOND V. BURKE ... 19 Lauderdale Road. 
Greenfield Heights. Woodbury, N.J. 08096 . . . 
B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 
GERALD P. COLLINS ... 328 Croft Road, North 
Wales, Pa. 19454 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION. 



ALBERT V. ANDREWS . . . 7421 Bingham 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
RAYMOND D. AYERS ... 12 Ashwood Lane, 
Norristown, Pa. 19401 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 

JOHN J. BOYLE . . . 9237 Angus Place, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19114 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION. 





JOHN L. COSTELLO, JR. ... 16 Hopatcong 
Drive, Trenton, N.J. 08638 . . . B.S. IN BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION. 

EDWIN S. CRANE, JR. . . . Box 244, Kulpsville. 
Pa. 19443 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION. 

RICHARD Y. CROW ... 126 Cricket Avenue, 
North Hills, Pa. 19038 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. Student Congress. 



35 




GEORGE B. EDWARDS ... 109 Stahl Road, 
Southampton, Pa. 18966 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION . . . Student Congress; Presi- 
dent, Vice-president, Editor— S. A.M. 
ROBERT J. FINLEY . . . 3306 Brighton Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION . . . Student Congress. 
MARGARET M. FORBES ... 543 Marwood 
Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 . . . AS. IN BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION. 



213 Lindenwold Ave- 
. . B.S. IN BUSINESS 



WILLIAM R. FREEMAN . 
nue, Ambler, Pa. 19002 
ADMINISTRATION. 

JAMES T. FUNK ... 1204 Englewood Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 

HENRY W. GOLDBERG ... 1358 Osbourne Av- 
enue, Roslyn, Pa. 19001 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 




DONALD A. GORDON . . . 4651 Horrocks Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19124 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 

JOSEPH L. HARKINS, JR. ... 3250 Hillside 
Drive, R.D. 1, Chalfont, Pa. 18914 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 
VINCENT C. HEHI 5150 N. 5th Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19120 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION . . . Managing Editor-EVENING 
COLLEGIAN; Yearbook Editor-Senior Class; 
President's Council; S.A.M.; Cross Keys. 



CHRISTIAN E. HENNINGSEN ... 401 S. 

Croskey Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19146 . . . B.S. 

IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 

ROBERT JOHNSON, JR. . . . 6709 N. Lawrence 

Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 19126 ... B.S. IN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 

WALTER S. KAMMER ... 515 E. Moreland 

Road, Willow Grove. Pa. 19090 . . . B.S. IN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 




36 



J. BRIAN A. KEEGAN 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19135 . 
ADMINISTRATION. 
PATRICK R KENNEDY 
Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
JOHN D. KRISCIUNAS .73 Wren Drive. Hol- 
land, Pa 18966 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION. 



7117 Gillespie St.. 
B.S. IN BUSINESS 



. . 6324 Wheeler 
19142 . . B.S. IN 




37 



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ROBERT KEPPARD ... 401 N. Courtland 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19140 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 
JOHN LAUGHLIN ... 41 Good Lane, Levittown, 
Pa. 19055 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION 

PAUL M. McARDLE ... 713 Disston Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 



MICHAEL J. McCARRIE ... 109 Merion Avenue, 
Narberth, Pa. 19072 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION. 

WILLIAM R. McSHANE, JR. . . . 3622 Livingston 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19134 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION . . . Student Con- 
gress; Marketing Association. 
HUBERT R. MAHON . . . 7165 State Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19135 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION . . . Student Congress. 



38 



WILLIAM E A. MARREN, JR . ., 1118 Boone 
Avenue, Roslyn, Pa. . . . B.S IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION . . . S.A.M.; Marketing Associ- 
ation. 

GILBERT R. MILLER 3056 Unruh Street. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION . . . Senior Social Dance 
Chairman. 

GREGORY MULROONEY . . . 3253 Princeton 
Avenue, Philadelphia. Pa. 19149 . . . B.S IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



GLEN P. J. NEPHIN . . . West Butler Pike, Am- 
bler. Pa. 19002 . . B.S IN BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION . Fathered two children and ac- 
quired a St. Bernard. 

JAMES W. PEARSON, JR 2806 Finley Ave- 
nue, Cornwells Heights, Pa. 19020 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 
ALBERT W. PFLUGER . . . 3222 Horner Avenue, 
Pennsauken. N.J. 08109 . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 





39 





ROBERT POPIELARSKI 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19137 
ADMINISTRATION. 
KENNETH RAICHLE . . . 
kins Park, Pa. 19117 .. . 
MINISTRATION. 
JOSEPH P. REES . 
delphia, Pa. 19144 
MINISTRATION. 



4445 Allen Street, 
B.S. IN BUSINESS 



221 Holme Avenue, El- 
B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 



5028 Keyser Street, Phila- 
. B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 



JOSEPH REGISTER. 12468 Sweet Brian Place, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 

PAOLO RICCI ... 463 Oak Court, Cornwell 
Heights, Pa. 19020 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION. 

EDWARD RUPPEI 1300 Fayette Street, Apt. 

205, Conshochocken, Pa. 19428 ... B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Dean's List Stu- 
dent; Evening Division Honors Fraternity Mem- 
ber. 






FRANCIS SCALFARO ... 1977 Pulaski Drive, 
Norristown, Pa. 19401 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. Chairman, Senior Formal. 
JOSEPH SCHARFF ... 45 Winding Way, Gibbs- 
boro, N.J. 08026 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION. 

HORACE J. SINCLAIR ... 624 E. Willow Grove 
Avenue, Glenside, Pa. 19138 . . . B.S. IN BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION. Class Representative; 
S.A.M. 



40 



FRANCIS STEINER . 9332 Rising Sun Ave- 
nue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19115 . . . B S. IN BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION. 

GERARD VOEGTLIN ... 517 San Gabriel, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN BUSINESS AD- 
MINISTRATION. Student Congress- 
Corresponding Secretary. 

RICHARD WITKOWSKI ... 143 Oxford Road. 
Cinnaminson. New Jersey, 08077 . . . B.S. IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





U 



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if I 



• . 







MATTHEW WROBLEWSKI ... 585 W. Bristol 
Road, Ivyland, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION. 




41 




Employee 



LT. JUDE WALSH 

INSTRUCTOR PHILA. POLICE ACADEMY 



42 




Part-Time 



Student 



JAMES T. FUNK 

BUYER SEARS AND ROEBUCK 

B.S. IN GENERAL BUSINESS 




44 




SILENCE IS THE BEGINNING OF THOUGHT 
THOUGHT IS THE BEGINNING OF IDEAS 
IDEAS ARE THE BEGINNING OF REALITY 
REALITY IS THE BEGINNING OF TRUTH 
TRUTH IS THE BEGINNING OF REALIZATION 
REALIZATION IS THE BEGINNING OF PRAYER 
PRAYER IS THE BEGINNING OF SILENCE 
SILENCE IS THE BEGINNING. 

-RUTH SHEVLIN 



45 




. . . the systematized logistical projection of the total reciprocal 
time phase in the synchronized third generation concept of the 
responsive transitional contingency of the functional organiza- 
tional option and the integrated digital programming . . . 




4 w * 




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L RUSSELL ABBEY ... 3 Mercer Hill Rd., Am- 
bler, Pa. 19002 . . . B.S. IN PRODUCTION MAN- 
AGEMENT. 

EVALD K. AUSTERLADE ... 513 Airy Ave., 
Chalfont, Pa. 18914 . . . B.S. IN MANAGEMENT 
. . . Senior Class— ticket co-chairman. 
MICHAEL J, BLASH . . . 8301 Ridgeway St., 
Phila., Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN PRODUCTION 
MANAGEMENT. 



LORENZO M. BOCCIARELLI ... 232 Soden Dr., 
Yardville, N.J. 08620 . . . A.S. IN INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT. 

HENRY J. BRUCKER JR. ... 215 W. Rubican 
St., Phila., Pa. 19120 ... A.S. IN INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT. 

RUSSELL S. CAMP ... 49 Casey Rd„ Holland 
Pa., 18966 . . . B.S. IN PRODUCTION MANAGE- 
MENT. 





DENNIS P. CARUSO ... 109 Hogeland Rd., 
Southampton, Pa. 18966 . . . B.S. IN IN- 
DUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT. 
ERNEST G. CIMINO ... 303 E. Rockland St., 
Phila., Pa. 19120 .. . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL MAN- 
AGEMENT. 

DONALD F. CLARK 810 Hancock St. Ridley 
Park, Pa. 19078 . . . B.S. IN MANAGEMENT. 



47 



GERALD P. CONNER ... 858 Scattergood St., 
Phila., Pa. 19124 . . . B.S. IN MANAGEMENT . . . 
Alpha Sigma Lambda. 

PAUL J. DEMPSEY . . . 1829 Roberta Ave., 
Abington, Pa., 19001 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 

MARYDENA DUNSCOMB ... 1912 Hoffnagle 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19152 ... B.S. IN IN- 
DUSTRIAL RELATIONS . . . Secretary, Senior 
Class; Student Congress; Year Book Staff. 





WALTER R. FISCHUK ... 1 78 W. Spencer 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 .. . B.S. IN PRO- 
DUCTION MANAGEMENT. 

DONALD R. FORTUNE, JR. ... 9224 Wooden 
Bridge Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 19114 ... B.S. 
IN PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 
HENRY J. GABRIEL . . . 13420 Trevose Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19116 ... B.S. IN PRODUC- 
TION MANAGEMENT. 



CARMEN A. GASPERO ... 4017 Pechin Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19128 ... B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT . . . S.A.M.; Student Congress; Cross 
Keys. 

LOUIS J. GRINGERI . . . 678 Cheryl Drive, 
Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 

W. R. HESLEY . . . 3427 "H" Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19134 . . . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT. 



JOHN J. DURMAN . . . 4474 Edgemont Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19137 . . . B.S. IN BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT . . Student Congress; College 
Council Alternate Representative. 
ROBERT J. FERN . . . 4236 "I" Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19124 . . . B.S. IN PRODUCTION 
MANAGEMENT. 

FRANK A. FERRARO ... 63 Bluebird Road, Hol- 
land, Pa. 18966 . . . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL MAN- 
AGEMENT . . . S.A.M.; Student Congress. 




AitifcrJ 



48 



RAYMOND J. INGRASSIA ...611 E. Pine 
Street, Trevose. Pa. 19047 . . . B.S. IN INDUS- 
TRIAL RELATIONS. 

SIDNEY KATZ ... 1606 Longshore Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 

JOSEPH KIRLIN, JR. 723 Gordon Drive, 

Morrisville. Pa. 19067 . . . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL 
RELATIONS. 




fciiiJlt 



JOHN S. KLEBAN 
Roslyn. Pa. 19001 . 



. 1340 St. Charles Place 
8.S. IN MANAGEMENT. 



JOSEPH J. KOZAK, JR. 
Warminster, Pa. 18974 . 
TION MANAGEMENT. 
JOSEPH T. KURTZ . . . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 . 
AL MANAGEMENT. 



.410 Elm Street 
B.S. IN PRODUC 




KENNETH E. LANNAN ... 14 W. 5th Street. 
Lansdale, Pa 19446 . . . B.S. IN MANAGEMENT. 
MARTIN J. LOUGHLIN ... 124 Cynwyd Road, 
Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 19004 . . . B.S. IN PRODUC- 
TION MANAGEMENT. 

DONALD T. LOVE ... 203 Susquehanna Ave- 
nue, Lansdale, Pa. 19446 . . . B.S. IN PRODUC- 
TION MANAGEMENT . . . Alpha Sigma Lambda. 



JAMES V. McDONALD . . . 1426 E. Hunting Park 

Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19124 . . . B.S. IN 

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 

DOUGLAS S. McFARLANE . . 

Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19116 . 

AGEMENT. 

GERALD D. McGURIMAN . . 

Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 . 

AGEMENT. 



15154 Miltord 
. B.S. IN MAN- 



12709 Kenny 
. B.S. IN MAN- 




49 




J. A. McGURIMAN . . . 5808 N. 7th Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19120 . . . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL RE- 
LATIONS . . . Alpha Sigma Lambda; S.A.M.; 
Dean's List. 

JOSEPH McKEOGH ... 149 Sumac Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19128 ... B.S. IN INDUSTRI- 
AL RELATIONS. 

JOHN J. MONSEES ... 145 Hamilton Road, 
Marlton, N.J. 08053 . . . B.S. IN INDUSTRIAL 
RELATIONS. 




JOYCE I. MOORE ... 3313 S. Keswick Terrace, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19114 ... B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 

JAMES A. MURDAH, JR. . . . 5919 Greene 
Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 . . . B.S. IN MAN- 
AGEMENT. 

KENNETH J. OKERSON . . . 3328 Gurley Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 ... B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 





W. S. PLETCHER, JR. ... 2650 Lisayne Drive, 

Hatboro, Pa. 19040 ... B.S. IN PRODUCTION 

MANAGEMENT . . . Student Congress; Senior 

Social Co-Chairman. 

WILLIAM L. RAYLMAN . 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19136 

MENT. 

ALFRED T. REHM, JR. . 

Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120 

MANAGEMENT. 



8124 Mora Street, 
B.S. IN MANAGE- 



645 E. Cheltenham 
B.S. IN 



50 



DAVID N. REIFF 8 Kynlyn Circle, Telford, 

Pa.. 18969 BS IN INDUSTRIAL MANAGE- 

MENT. 

JOHN V. ROCKS . . 2131 Wodock Avenue, 
Warrington, Pa. 18976 . . . BS. IN INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT. 

JOHN S SAMULEWICZ . . . 3318 Almond 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19134 . . . BS. IN MAN- 
AGEMENT 




O.K., men, here's de plan. Louie, you 

check Duke da Duplicator an see if he 

maybe got de copies of de past an- 

num's test. Foxy, whatsa story on dat 

dame? Does she got de goods on de 

prof? 

No, Boss, he's clean. 

O.K., if nuttin' else woiks, Satch, you 

got de dime— make de call at 7 in de P 

M sharp an lay de bomb scare on 

dem. 

Gotcha, Boss . . . 





. . 88 School Lane, 
B.S. IN MANAGE- 



HENRY A. SCHINNAGEL 
Norristown, Pa. 19401 . . 
MENT. 

JOHN J THOMAS . . . 1017 Mueller Road, 
Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT . . . Student Congress; Year Book; Chair- 
man, Awards Committee. 

GEORGE J. THOMPSON, JR. ... 6823 Torres- 
dale Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19135 . . . B.S. 
IN PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 




JAMES F. VERRELLE ... 944 Station Avenue, 
B-10, Cornwells Heights, Pa. 19020 . . . B.S. IN 
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT. 
JAMES J. WALKER . . . 4759 Richmond Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19137 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 

ROBERT WEICKE ... 10804 Rayland Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 ... B.S. IN INDUSTRI- 
AL RELATIONS. 



52 




NORMAN M. WEISS . . . 7360 N. 20th Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa B.S. IN MANAGEMENT . . . 

Student Congress; S.A.M.; President's Council. 
JACK M. WENTZELL, JR. . . . 304 Front Street, 
Delran, N.J. 08075 . . . B.S. IN PRODUCTION 
MANAGEMENT. 

WILLIAM A. WETTERAU ... 317 Forest Avenue, 
Willow Grove, Pa. 19090 . . . B.S. IN MANAGE- 
MENT. 



53 




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THOMAS D. ADAMS . . . 4537 Marple Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 19136 . . . B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING . . . Student Congress. 

JOSEPH S. ANSUINI . . . 2700 Elroy Road, Hat- 
field, Pa. 19440 ... B.S. IN MARKETING ... 
Marketing Association. 

JAMES J. CAGNO . . . 2501 Township Line 
Road C-17, Willow Grove, Pa. 19090 . . . B.S. IN 
MARKETING. 



NICHOLAS R. CIMINO ... 474 Lyceum Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19128 ... B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING. 

NICHOLAS J. DELONG ... 3310 N. Palethorpe 
Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 19140 . . . B.S. IN MAR- 
KETING. 

THOMAS J. FRANGICETTO ... 7813 Revere 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19152. .. B.S. IN MAR- 
KETING. 





RUSSELL J. FRITH ... 1064 Oakwood Street, 
Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING. 
FRED R. GALE ... 3010 Willits Road, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19136 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING . . . 
Senior Class Dance Chairman. 
EDWARD F. GUTEKUNST ... 238 Colonial 
Drive, Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MAR- 
KETING . . . Marketing Association, Student 
Congress. 



57 



ROBERT P. HENASEY ... 662 Paddock Rd., 
Southampton, Pa. 18966 . . . B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING. 

JOHN J. KANE ... 728 Surrey Lane, Glenolden 
Pa. 19036 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING . . . Market- 
ing Association, Student Congress. 
THOMAS A. KENNEY JR. . . . 201 W. Holly Ave. 
Oaklyn, N.J. 08107 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING . . 
Marketing Association. 






Marketing For A Career? 




WALTER J. LASKOWSKI . . . 6204 Algon Ave. 
Apt. B, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN 
MARKETING . . . Marketing Association. 
ROBERT J. McARDLE . . . 3801 Gladwyn Ave., 
Pennsauken, N.J. 08110 . . . B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING. 

MICHAEL J. McGRANAGHAN . . . 7955 Church 
Rd., Rockledge, Pa. 19111 ... B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING . . . Yearbook, Marketing Association. 



THOMAS M. McGUIRE ... 877 Primrose Dr., 
Warminster, Pa. 18974 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING. 
JOHN W. NEITHERCOTT ... 204 Barren Hill 
Rd., Conshohocken, Pa. 19428 ... B.S. IN 
MARKETING. 

WALTER R. NOWICKI . . . 5274 Montour St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19124 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING 
. . . President, Marketing Association '71-72. 



59 






ijfj 



ANTHONY F. PELLEGRINO . . . 12228 Medford 
Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 ... B.S. IN MAR- 
KETING . . . Vice-President, Senior Class. Presi- 
dent, Marketing Association '70-71, Student 
Congress— Presidents' Council, Cross Keys, Al- 
pha Epsilon. 

GEORGE W. SHURR, JR. ... 4748 Seminole 
Ave., Oakford, Pa. 19047 . . . B.S. IN MARKET- 
ING. 

JOHN JULIUS SHAWARYN JR. . . . 7404 Henry 
Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19128 ... B.S. IN MAR- 
KETING . . . Co-ordinating Editor for Yearbook, 
Marketing Association. 



FRANK A. SZYMENDERA . . . 2829 Hedley St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19137 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING 

. . . Marketing Association. 

FRANCIS X. TAGYE ... 11807 Colman Terrace, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19154 ... B.S. IN Marketing 

. . . Student Congress, Marketing Association, 

Accounting Association, Senior Class— Ticket 

Co-chairman. 

ROBERT N. TIMPKO ... 920 Alexander Ave., 

Drexel Hill, Pa. 19026 . . . B.S. IN MARKETING. 




60 





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ANTHONY J. BARBA . . . 1020 Spencer St., 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19141 . . . B.A. IN PRE-LAW 
CAROL S. BEIDLER . . 7862 Devon St, Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 19118 . . . B.A. IN HUMANITIES. 
WILLIAM JOHN BELL . . . 3544 Bleigh Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19136 . . . B.A. IN HISTORY. 




MARY BENZING . 

delphia, Pa. 19118 

CATION. 

WILLIAM J. BENZING . 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19118 

GY. 

ROZANNE M. BOYLE . . . 6233 Lambert Street, 

Philadelphia. Pa. 19138 ... B.A. IN ENGLISH 

EDUCATION . . . Student Congress; Treasurer, 

Marketing Association. 




JOSEPH F. CALNON ... 73 Executive Lane, 
Willingboro, N.J. 08046 . . . B.A. IN HISTORY 
. . . Nu Psi Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta; Dean's 
List. 

JEANNE M. DEMPSEY ... 88 Station Avenue 
#2. North Hills, Pa. 19038 ... B.A. IN ENG- 
LISH. 

ANNE MARIE DURKIN ... 105 Webster Avenue, 
Wyncote, Pa. 19095 ... B.A. IN HUMANITIES 
. . . Editor, EVENING COLLEGIAN; Yearbook 
Staff; Literary Magazine. 



65 



RICHARD J. EVANS . . . 7357 Hill Road, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19128 . . . B.A. IN HUMANITIES. 
RUTH D. FISHER ... 444 E. Pleasant St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19119 . . . B.A. IN ENGLISH. 
DAVID WILLIAM HAASIS ... 382 County Line 
Road, Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 19006 . . . B.A. IN 
HUMANITIES . . . STUDENT CONGRESS '67, 
'68.. 





. . 1021 East Prospect 
19454 . . . B.A. IN HIS- 



KAY ANN HAMPTON 

Ave., North Wales, Pa 

TORY. 

DONALD HILBERT ... 920 Second Street, Full 

erton, Pa. 18052 . . . B.A. IN HUMANITIES. 

JULIE T. HYDE . . . 1221 Boekius Avenue 

Abington, Pa. 19001 . . . B.A. IN ENGLISH. 



66 



CHARLES R JOHNSON ... 293 Norfolk Road. 
Warminster. Pa. 18974 . . . B.A. IN HISTORY. 
NILE REUBEN LINN JR. ... 221 Crestview 
Road, Hatboro. Pa. 19040 . B.A. IN HISTORY. 
JAMES MICHAEL MADDEN . . . 3208 Cottman 
Ave.. Philadelphia. Pa. 19149 ... B.A. IN HIS- 
TORY. 





"Many a doctrine is like a window pane. 
We see truth through it but it divides us from truth." 
Kahlil Gibran 





MICHAEL G. McMENAMIN ... 508 Solly Ave- 
nue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.A. IN ECO- 
NOMICS . . . ALPHA SIGMA LAMBDA 71, '72. 
DOROTHY REILLY . . . 6706 Rutland Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19149 ... B.A. IN ENGLISH 
. . . STUDENT CONGRESS '68. 
MARGARET OLSON SEYDOW . . . 6428 Fairhill 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19126 .. . B.A. IN HUMAN- 
ITIES . . . STUDENT CONGRESS '69. 



67 



ELMER J. SHAMWELI 536 E. Parnell Place, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 ... B.A. IN HUMANI- 
TIES. 

WILLIAM T. SMALL ... 1005 Hudson Avenue, 
Deptford, New Jersey 08096 . . . B.A. IN ENG- 
LISH-EDUCATION. 

LINDA STONEBACK . . . 10830A Nandina Lane, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 19116 ... B.A. IN ENGLISH- 
EDUCATION. 







CELESTE VENERI ... 212 Stevens Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 ... B.A. IN HUMANI- 
TIES. 

MARTHA MclVER WARD . . . 1807 Widener 
Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 19141 . . . B.A. IN ENG- 
LISH . . . EVENING COLLEGIAN, YEARBOOK. 
WILLIAM D. WHITE ... 916 E. Slocum Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19150 ... B.A. IN HUMANI- 
TIES. 




69 




Time Out For Family Life 




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Accounting Association 




IEEE— Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 





The Institute of Electrical and Elec- 
tronic Engineers is a national profes- 
sional organization. Its aims include 
the advancement of the theory and 
practice of radio and allied engineer- 
ing and of the related arts and scien- 
ces. Students registered in the Elec- 
tronics Physics curriculum as degree 
candidates are eligible for member- 
ship in the Student Branch of IEEE. 



73 



Presidents' Council 




Student Congress 



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